Interview with Sam Barlow: Well, music has shaped my entire life: Video, Photos

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Interview with Texas-based multitalented blues musician Sam Barlow, both frontman and session player has spanned a wide array of genres.

How has the Blues and Rock n’ Roll music influenced your views of the world and the journeys you’ve taken?

Well, music has shaped my entire life. I’ve been playing music as long as I can remember and the Blues has always been my driving force, probably the most important thing to me; however, I spent many years on the road playing Country music, as well as Rock and Roll music, and many other genres. Those were journeys in and of themselves. I have enjoyed playing these different genres for many different audiences, in a plethora of different situations over the course of the years, and have made the comment that I am blessed to both literally, and figuratively, wear a different hat every night- so to speak.

How do you think that you have grown as an artist since you first started? Where does your creative drive come from?

That is a very complex question because, as an artist, one thing that we can be assured of is that we will always be better tomorrow than we are today, as long as we keep persevering. I think the Lord has blessed me in being able to find inspiration and growth in places that other people might not and being able to reflect that in the music is something that I strive towards. My creative drive is mainly out of a love for the blues, a little bit of perfectionism, a little bit of spite, definitely a few women, a general curiosity, and a love to “preach” the blues to my juke-joint congregation.

Which meetings have been the most important experiences? What was the best advice anyone ever gave you?

I think by far the most important meeting that I ever had would be with the president of Montrose records and my good friend, Mr. Richard Cagle. He has helped me exponentially grow, both musically and personally. I am blessed and thankful for everything that he, his family, and everyone else at Montrose Records has done for me! The best advice anyone ever gave me would have to be the advice that I received from my maternal grandmother, Cristina Sonnen, “Anything they can do; you can do better.”

Are there any memories from gigs, jams, open acts, and studio sessions which you’d like to share with us?

I think some of the more recent and important memories to me would be the studio sessions when recording my debut album Faith in the Blues. I traveled to the mountains of Ruidoso, to the Montrose Records studio, with four of my best friends/worthy constituents who also happened to be my bandmates and recorded what I think is just an amazing album. I’m so proud of every part of it. Much praise to Joe Seltzer, Dave Hamilton, the late Tony Movsesian, Izzy Aguirre, Annika Chambers, Erwin Solbach, Maribel Rubio, and Michael Scott for their superb contributions. As far as a memory, that came when we recorded the final track of my album, Valentine Special. We were standing in a circle, clapping and playing-Tony playing washboard and I on guitar-and everything cut live. That was an amazing moment and really summed up the energy of the entire production.

What do you miss most nowadays from the music of the past? What are your hopes and fears for the future?

I miss the impulsivity, the “live” energy, the attention to detail, the ability to choke interesting and different sounds out of analog instruments, and the childlike nature that we used to have about musical curiosity and the freedom that came with the Blues, Jazz, and other truly American musical art forms. My hope for the future is that the Blues will thrive in ways that is yet to be seen…that it will be magnified to the fullness of glory and that I will be instrumental in bringing it forth.

What would you say characterizes Texas blues scene in comparison to other US local scenes and circuits?

I think one of the things that might characterize the Texas Blues scene would be hospitality. I’ve never been to a blues jam in Texas where I was made to feel less than welcome. In fact, whenever you listen to the old records of Albert Collins, Freddie King, and Lightning Hopkins and alike– you feel compelled and attracted to their music. There is, however; another side to that and that would be virtuosity.

I think that Texas Blues musicians have been known for many years to generally show “the pinnacle” of musicianship in their performances and I’m very proud to have learned and played alongside so many people that embody that. And lastly, I could not forget to mention “soul”…Blues soaked with Soul.

What are some of the most important lessons you have learned from your experience in the music paths?

To trust your gut and to do your own thing. No matter what- stay in your lane and keep pushing towards your goals.

What is the impact of music on the socio-cultural implications? How do you want it to affect people?

I feel that when those of us in ‘The True Blue Band’ play music for audiences and when listeners hear our record, the goal is to make people happy. My personal mission is to be the catalyst that spreads enough happiness so that everyone has “Faith in the blues.”

Let’s take a trip with a time machine, so where and why would you really want to go for a whole day?

I’d like to drive a DeLorean, 88 miles per hour into the future, to the day that I win my 10th or 11th Grammy.

Interview by Michael Limnios

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Interview with Eb Davis: The music will get a fair shake in the industry and my fear is that it will not: Video, Photos

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Interview with charismatic showman Eb Davis, the Blues Ambassador of Arkansas has been delighting audiences all over the world.

How has the Blues and Soul music influenced your views of the world and the journeys you’ve taken?

My views of the world in the many journeys that I have taken has been greatly shaped and formed by having been lucky enough to be a part of a very special community. The community of Blues and Soul music. In many parts of the world I have met and formed many contacts and friends by being a part of this special community of people.

How do you think that you have grown as an artist since you first started and what has remained the same?

I have grown as an artist over the years by learning more and more about my heritage and the people that looks like me who has gone and left this world impacted legacy. The thing that has remained the same is my love of and dedication to this treasure left to me.

Arkansas, Memphis, NYC. What are the differences and similarities between the US local scenes?

When we compare Arkansas, Memphis and New York. Some of the differences I found. Many of the blues greats (Albert King, Son Seals, Robert Junior Lockwood, Sonny boy Williamson, just to name a few, all immigrated from Arkansas. In my youth the two main hubs of blues and Soul activities were in Helena Arkansas and Memphis Tennessee. With Beale street in Memphis being a magnet attracting people from numerous other cities and towns. New York City had a very good music scene but was never known as a Blues Mecca. During my stay in New York I had to work a lot in the Soul or Soul Blues Genre.

Are there any memories from your new album Treasures From The Vault studio sessions which you’d like to share with us?

One of the most outstanding memories from treasures from the vault is spending a day in the studio with so many good musicians and listening to their various experiences in the music industry and their various takes on the music that we call the Blues.

What do you miss most nowadays from the music of past? What are your hopes and fears for the future of?

The thing I miss most from the music of the past is the sheer dedication that was brought to it. When people played it just for the love of and dedication to the art form. My hopes for the future is that the music will get a fair shake in the industry and my fear is that it will not.

If you could change one thing in the musical world and it would become a reality, what would that be?

If I could change just one thing and it became a reality it would be all of these rockers, pretenders, blues wannabes, etc. calling themselves Blues Artists with absolutely no knowledge of or dedication to, the art form.

How has the blues business changed over the years since you first started in music?

It has changed in the was that now there are not the hundreds of venues that existed when I started out and other forms of music has come along and basically pushed the Blues onto the back burner. When I started out the Blues was played from one end of the country to the other.

Some music styles can be fads but the Blues is always with us. Why do think that is?

So long as there are people there will be Blues because it is the only music that speaks across the boundaries, languages, cultures, and experiences of the human race.

What are some of the most important lessons you have learned from your experience in the music paths?

One of the most outstanding lessons I have learned in the business is the power of music, especially Blues, to touch people on a very personal and emotional level. Plus, the Power that it has in making and cementing friendships.

What is the impact of music on the civil rights and socio-cultural implications? How do you want it to affect people?

I would want and hope that music would be listened to with open ears and minds because music speaks to a wide array of socio-cultural implications.

Let’s take a trip with a time machine, so where and why would you really want to go for a whole day?

If I could take a trip in a time machine it would be back to the days of my youth hanging out on Beale street in Memphis watching greats like little junior Parker, BB King, Roscoe Gordon, and the magnificent Bobby Blue Bland. All just hanging out on Beale street.

Interview by Michael Limnios

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Eric Clapton and Van Morrison: Stand up and commit: Video, Photo

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We recorded the song “Stand And Deliver”, the proceeds of which will be transferred to the Lockdown Financial Hardship Fund.

Morrison established it to “help musicians struggling financially amid the COVID-19 pandemic.”

Eric Clapton and Van Morrison have released their anti-lockdown collaboration, “Stand and Deliver.”

Written by Morrison and performed by Clapton, the four-and-a-half minute bluesy track expresses dissatisfaction with the government-ordered lockdowns spurred by rising cases of COVID-19.

“Do you wanna be a free man/ Or do you wanna be a slave?/ Do you wanna wear these chains/ Until you’re lying in the grave?” Clapton sings.

Other lyrics include: “Magna Carta, Bill of Rights/ The constitution, what’s it worth?/ You know they’re gonna grind us down, ah/ Until it really hurts/ Is this a sovereign nation/ Or just a police state?/ You better look out, people/ Before it gets too late.”

The song ends with Clapton singing, “Dick Turpin wore a mask too,” referring to the 18th century highwayman who wore a mask to conceal his identity while committing crimes.

“Stand and Deliver” is in support of Morrison’s Save Live Music campaign. Morrison has recently released three other songs protesting the U.K.’s lockdown, titled “Born to Be Free,” “As I Walked Out” and “No More Lockdown.”

Morrison’s anti-lockdown tracks have been the subject of criticism, including from Northern Ireland Health Minister Robin Swann.

“It’s actually a smear on all those involved in the public health response to a virus that has taken lives on a massive scale,” Swann told Rolling Stone in September. “His words will give great comfort to the conspiracy theorists – the tin foil hat brigade who crusade against masks and vaccines and think this is all a huge global plot to remove freedoms.”

Proceeds from “Stand and Deliver” will go to the Morrison’s Lockdown Financial Hardship Fund, which helps musicians facing difficulties as a result of the coronavirus and resulting lockdown measures.

Both musicians have expressed concern over the state of live music, even once the pandemic is over.

“We must stand up and be counted because we need to find a way out of this mess,” Clapton previously said in a statement. “The alternative is not worth thinking about. Live music might never recover.”

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Van Morrison and Eric Clapton

Van Morrison and Eric Clapton

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Interview with Jeremiah Johnson: Southern Heaven Gate: Video, Photos

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Interview with St. Louis-based Jeremiah Johnson: the voice of Mississippi River blues blending with the struggles of everyday life.

How has the Blues, Rock and Roots music influenced your views of the world and the journeys you’ve taken?

If there is one thing my music journey has taught me, it’s the fact that you can’t judge a book by it’s cover. I have seen people who look conservative completely burn up the dance floor and throw it down. I have also seen big strong biker guys break down in tears when they hear a song that touches their heart. In the end of the day, it seems we all have a big heart for music.

How do you describe your sound, music philosophy and songbook? Where does your creative drive come from?

It can be hard to describe my sound, but it starts out with a 70’s southern rock, blues-based foundation. I have a bit of a Kentucky/Southern accent that comes out occasionally, and I always try to do what is best for the song. A good song is where the magic mojo all begins. There are thousands of amazing guitar players, it’s good songwriting that separates the diamonds from the coal.

It seems like I have been dreaming about playing the guitar and writing songs since my life began. Truthfully, I was 6 years old when I first begged my parents to pay for guitar lessons. It’s been a long road and a lot of years with the same dream.

Which meetings have been the most important experiences? What was the best advice anyone ever gave you?

There have been many moments in my career that I could point to as “important experiences” and it is hard to say that one or the other was more important. I would say I am extremely thankful for the friendship I have had with Mike Zito and Devon Allman. I have known them for decades now and it makes me happy to see both doing so well. They have both been good to me. Zito and Allman have both produced records for me.

The best advice I have is, “Every step forward, no natter how small, is a step in the right direction. It could be a long road ahead, just keep moving forward and you will reach your goals. The true joy of life is in the journey.”

Are there any memories from gigs, jams, open acts and studio sessions which you’d like to share with us?

In 2019, I was fortunate enough of tour with Mike Zito. We had a 12-hr drive across Germany and Zito asked me if I wanted to take a journey or ride in the van. I said let take a journey! We rode in a taxi, two different trains, two different trains and one short plane ride. We arrived at the hotel doorstep in about 10 hours and I had such a wonderful experience traveling across Germany. I hope to be back in Europe in Fall of 2021.

What do you miss most nowadays from the blues of the past? What are your hopes and fears for the future of?

I can’t say I miss anything nowadays; I just wish blues was popular like it was in the 80’ and 90’s. Bands like The Fabulous Thunderbirds, SRV and Eric Clapton used to be on the big radio stations. If we keep going the way we are headed with streaming services and lack of interest in physical CD’s, smaller blues artists are not going to be able to earn a living.

Why do you think that Ruf Records (Label) continues to generate such a devoted following?

Because Thomas Ruf is a genius! Hell, he signed me didn’t he! Seriously, Ruf Records consistently puts out high quality artists who push the envelopes of the genera. I am proud to be on Ruf Records and have a great relationship with everyone at the label.

What would you say characterizes St. Louis Blues scene in comparison to other local US scenes and circuits?

To me St Louis Blues is somewhere between Texas and Chicago styles of blues. Lot’s of horn players, plenty of piano players and a solid band that can not only shuffle, but they can bring the heat. It’s hard to explain. Why don’t you come visit our city and I can show you how good it feels.

What is the impact of music on the socio-cultural implications? How do you want it to affect people?

Blues music brings people of all kinds, together and helps one realize that we are more alike than not. I hope my music makes you want to dance, close your eyes and forget what troubles you.

Let’s take a trip with a time machine, so where and why would you really want to go for a whole day?

I would like to go back to the amazing concerts I went to in my youthful party days and actually pay attention to the damn concert! I went to some great concerts and only seen half of them!

Interview by Michael Limnios

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Taylor credits Kuti with pushing him, and others, to compose distinctly African music: Video, Photos

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Ebo Taylor became one of Ghana’s major prolific musicians in the 1950s and ‘60s, making his signature Ghanaian highlife that influenced the father of afrobeat, Fela Kuti.

As highlife and afrobeat music has entered the global stage, Taylor’s work has been sampled by international R&B artist Usher on his 2010 track “She Don’t Know,” featuring rapper Ludacris, and by Canadian hip-hop duo Ghetto Concept on their 1992 track “Certified.” His influence can also be seen in afrobeat’s clubbier offshoot, afrobeats (with an “s”), which has hit international charts through West African acts like Wizkid, who has collaborated with artists including Drake and Major Lazer.

And Taylor is still recording new material at age 84.

“Uncle Ebo,” as he’s known by locals in Saltpond, the small Ghanaian fishing town he’s called home since birth, has spent most of this year in his home studio observing Covid-19 protocols and recording new material for his third studio album in 10 years.

Since the release of his 2010 album “Love and Death,” as well as his collaboration with the Berlin-based Afrobeat Academy in 2011, Taylor’s international profile has been raised. In 2017, the release of Ghana funk anthem “Come Along,” made DJ playlists globally, according to Taylor. But Taylor’s newfound global fame is the culmination of his own influence on West African music since the early 1960s.

West African roots

Born in 1936, Taylor grew up listening to the highlife music that has always been at the heart of his style, which fuses jazz elements with traditional highlife for a groovier sound. “I was inspired by the pioneering saxophonist and trumpeter E.T. Mensah and his band The Tempos,” he said in a recent interview in Saltpond.

Taylor joined the Stargazers, a highlife band led by saxophonist Teddy Osei and drummer Sol Amarfio (who would both go on to form the legendary British-based Afro rock band, Osibisa) shortly after leaving college. In 1962, Taylor moved to London to study music at the Eric Gilder School of Music with funding from a government cultural program instituted by Ghana’s first prime minister and president Dr. Kwame Nkrumah, who secured independence for Ghana from British rule. It was in London that Taylor first met and collaborated with Nigerian saxophonist Peter King and Afrobeat legend Kuti.

“Fela used to come to my apartment in Willesden quite often and we’d spend hours playing records,” Taylor said. “When he came to Ghana in ‘67, he drove to Cape Coast to see me and we spent the afternoon talking about African Unity.”

The story of highlife and Afrobeat legend Ebo Taylor, in his own words

The story of highlife and Afrobeat legend Ebo Taylor, in his own words

Taylor credits Kuti with pushing him, and others, to compose distinctly African music. “He (Fela) never understood why as Africans we like playing jazz; he wanted us to be ourselves, be original and tell our stories,” Taylor said.

After moving back to Ghana in 1965, Taylor became the in-house guitarist, arranger and producer for the influential Ghanaian record label Essiebons, founded by music producer Dick Essilfie-Bondzie. It was during this period that Taylor recorded over 10 albums and put his stamp on projects by West African music legends like Pat Thomas, C.K. Mann and Gyedu-Blay Ambolley. The quality of Essiebons’ studio and the genius of Taylor made Essiebons one of the preferred recording studios for musicians from all over West Africa. Sadly, Ghana’s tumultuous political and economic environment throughout the 1970s and ‘80s, marked by multiple coups and government reorganizations following the ousting of Nkrumah, stifled the development of its music industry and arguably Taylor’s rise to global stardom.

Global influences

Yet Taylor’s influence can be seen across genres today, particularly with the emergence of afrobeats in the early 2000s, fusing afrobeat and highlife with EDM, hip-hop and reggae.

Taylor is quick to highlight the fact that the popularity of afrobeats has coincided with its embrace of authentically African arrangements and a departure from heavy hip-hop and R&B sounds which he believes could seem forced. “The music we made was real music, it made you stop and think,” he said. “It’s not surprising that people are connecting with afrobeats more now that it is embracing elements from the music we made.”

Taylor won’t say much about his highly anticipated new release. But it is uncharted territory for the guitarist and composer. He is working on it without support from two of his key collaborators: Essilfie-Bondzie, who became Taylor’s career-long executive producer; and Tony Allen, the legendary Nigerian drummer with whom he collaborated extensively on his recent projects. Allen and Essilfie-Bondzie died within months of each other earlier this year. Taylor fondly remembers both of them and lights up as he recalls his studio sessions with Allen. “The entire studio would freeze,” he said.”We just couldn’t understand how he was creating those sounds. Nobody knew what to expect next. It was magic.”

Over the last few years, Taylor has toured extensively throughout Europe with his Saltpond City band, marshalled by his son Roy, and has been more likely to be seen playing in Amsterdam or Berlin than in Accra or Lagos.

While Taylor is likely to slow down on touring, he intends to continue making music. “It’s what I love to do, it’s who I am,” he said. He intends to introduce his music to younger and more mainstream audiences and was keen to express his desire to collaborate with Ghanaian rappers M.anifest and Reggie Rockstone.

Like his hero Nkrumah, who Taylor believes is unique among African leaders past and present for his concern for the common man, Taylor wants to be remembered as a man of the people — not as a rockstar. “I want to be remembered for my music, for my art and as Ebo Taylor the man,” he said.

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EBO TAYLOR FALL TOUR 13'

EBO TAYLOR FALL TOUR 13'

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Interview with Hamilton Loomis: Season Blues Greetings: Video, Photos

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Interview with Texas blues musician Hamilton Loomis: Christmas album “This Season” brings us hope – at a time when it’s needed most.

How has the Blues and Rock Counterculture influenced your views of the world and the journeys you’ve taken?

I can say growing up in the Blues scene really opened my eyes to the power of music to unite people. I was lucky to be mentored by Blues veterans, and they showed me how music shatters the barriers between race, culture, age, gender, etc., and that’s more important than ever to be a part of in our very divided country and world.

How do you describe your sound, music philosophy and songbook? Where does your creative drive come from?

People have said my “sound” is hard to describe…it’s really a mash-up of all my favorite music I listened to growing up: Soul, Blues, Rock, Funk, and Pop. I try to make my sound as homogenous as possible, so it comes out as Funk rhythms with Blues & Rock guitar, Soul-like vocals, and most written with Pop-type melodies. As far as creative drive, I have learned to find inspiration in everyday life, sometimes from everyday things, and turn them into something uplifting or inspirational. A lot of my recent inspiration has come from my 6-year-old son, who was diagnosed with hyperinsulinism, a rare pancreatic disease that causes dangerously low blood sugar. This has also changed my mission to include raising awareness for hyperinsulinism and hypoglycemia.

Are there any memories from gigs, jams, and studio which you’d like to share? What was the best advice anyone ever gave you?

I think my favorite memory was Bo Diddley calling me on stage to jam with him when I was 16…it spawned a friendship with him that lasted until he passed away, and I’m so grateful for it! He gave me a lot of advice and encouragement…the best advice was to find my own sound: “Don’t sound like me, sound like YOU. Innovate, don’t imitate”. That was the beginning of my journey in becoming as artist.

What do you miss most nowadays from the blues of the past? What are your hopes and fears for the future of?

I think I miss the original authenticity, to be honest…the Blues pioneers and Blues masters sang about their lives, and about their truth, which was so pure. I knew early on that even though I had a deep reverence for Blues, and was educated by some notable Blues masters, I didn’t live the life they did, nor could I ever sing about the topics they sang about. I knew I had to find my own truth, and sing about my experiences and from my perspective, while still honoring the music and passing it on to future generations.

If you could change one thing in the musical world and it would become a reality, what would that be?

I wish that talent + vision + originality = automatic success and millions of records sold. I know so many amazing musicians and artists who never make it, and yet there are many untalented and/or unoriginal artists that top the charts. It doesn’t seem fair.

What touched (emotionally) you from the Christmas’ spirit and songs? How does the Seasons affect your mood and inspiration?

I love that Christmas is all about togetherness, family, giving, etc. I feel like Christmas (in general) gives the world a much-needed jolt of positivity. Regarding the seasons, that’s a tough one, because here in South Texas where I live, we have basically one season: HOT. I mean, it occasionally gets cold in Winter, but not for long…it was 78 degrees last Christmas, and I remember 3 or 4 years ago it was 80 degrees! In fact, this very situation inspired me to write one of my Christmas songs, “Another South Texas Christmas” which is totally tongue-in-cheek, but a really fun song to perform live.

What are some of the most important lessons you have learned from your experience in the music paths?

I mentioned this in an earlier question, but music (and especially LIVE music) is truly one of the only things that brings different people together. Over the years, I’ve had many small onstage moments that have made a huge impact in my life: watching black & white people synchronously bobbing their heads at a concert, watching an old guy fist-bump a young guy at a live show, watching poor folks jammin’ out next to rich folks…these may seem like small things, but they showed me the power of music, and made me sure that I was doing something meaningful in the world.

What is the impact of Blues on the socio-cultural implications? How do you want it to affect people?

First of all, I think that it’s important that people realize and understand the struggles and hardships Black Americans were going through when this music was first created, and how it literally influenced all American music to follow. Also, it’s important for musicians of my generation to educate the younger generations on this topic, and how important Blues is for our history. Now, even though times have changed, and the music has evolved and changed, I believe that at its core, Blues is about expression, and everybody has something to say or express… and when artists put their music out there into the world, they connect with people who feel the same things.

Let’s take a trip with a time machine, so where and why would you really want to go for a whole day?

That’s a tough one! I think I would love to experience a day at Woodstock 1969… I think that festival was an amazing historical event for music, not just because there were so many amazing artists that performed there, but because of the peaceful gathering. That year produced some of my favorite music of all time. Let’s just pick a day that it didn’t rain!

Interview by Michael Limnios

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Interview with Jack de Keyzer: Tribute to the masters: Video, Photos

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Interview with Canadian guitarist Jack de Keyzer, pays tribute to the great blues masters and heroes

How has the Blues and Rock Counterculture influenced your views of the world and the journeys you’ve taken?

I grew up in the era of hippies and psychedelia and very liberal views and I haven’t really changed through the years. I’m peace and love guy.

How do you describe your sound, music philosophy and songbook? Where does your creative drive come from?

My sound is very blues oriented with strong elements of British blues rock. I grew up with the Beatles the Rolling Stones and a few later years later, when I’d been playing the guitar for a couple of years I was heavily influenced by Clapton, Cream, Jimi Hendrix and a few years after that Led Zeppelin. A few years after that I became very influenced by the original blues people starting with Robert Johnson, and a lot of the Chess records Chicago Blues masters. I am also very influenced by soul jazz, hard bop and a lot of the Blue Note jazz musicians.

Which meetings have been the most important experiences? What was the best advice anyone ever gave you?

My first big mentor was a guy from Canada named King Biscuit Boy aka Richard Newell. He had one of the largest blues record collections in Canada and was an internationally acclaimed recording artist singer, songwriter and harmonica player. He turned me onto all the great bluesman, on Chess records, Specialty records, Excello, King, Sun, just to name a few. It was a great education and my first big time pro gig.

Are there any memories from gigs, jams, open acts and studio sessions which you’d like to share with us?

I played a series of shows with Bo Diddley in the 90s. We were rehearsing at the El Mocambo night club in Toronto getting ready for our first of two nights. He looked at the drummer and said do you know the Bo Diddley beat? The drummer nodded yeah man of course! Bo looked at him and said, ‘don’t play it.’ Because- Bo Diddley played that beat on his guitar! Nobody else was supposed to play that. We all had to play counterpoint rhythms to what he was playing. I Also played for a week with the incredible Etta James. She called me “the Canadian Keith Richards”, I also got lots of great advice from classic Blues people like Muddy Waters drummer, the late great Willie “Big Eyes” Smith. Whenever I got too fancy, too high up the neck, or too fast, he’d look at me and say “Take your time son- play the blues” These guys they only played with feeling -if you can’t play with feeling -you may as well not play at all! And that’s my little bit of advice.

What do you miss most nowadays from the blues of the past? What are your hopes and fears for the future of?

I miss authenticity, I miss blues with a feeling. There’s way too much importance put on how many guitars you have on stage, and what vintage they are, and how fast you can play and which fancy venue in which country you toured. It’s just faking it- there’s no real feeling there. Rich people playing and buying their way into the blues – I can’t go for that! No can do.

Make an account of the case of the blues in Canada. Which is the most interesting period in local blues scene?

The blues scene in Canada is the strongest it’s ever been right now. There are so many great artists. Classic artists like Colin James. Sue Foley is a very good player and singer, my friends in Monkey Junk, Paul DesLauriers Band, Steve Strongman, Dawn Tyler Watson are all world-class. And also, young up-and-coming guys like Spencer MacKenzie are making great records.

What are some of the most important lessons you have learned from your experience in music paths?

What I love about music is that the possibilities are limitless. I consider myself a lifelong student of music and love every day that I get to play, practice and compose. Music is a never-ending fountain of inspiration.

What is the impact of music on the socio-cultural implications? How do you want it to affect people?

Nietzsche said it best, “Life without music would be a mistake”. And here’s my quote “Music is the glue that binds us together.”

Let’s take a trip with a time machine, so where and why would you really want to go for a whole day?

Jimi Hendrix Experience debut at the Bag o’ Nails club in London England November 25, 1966. Every British blues rocker was at that gig, the Rolling Stones, Clapton, Jeff Beck, Pete Townsend, Jimmy Page, John Mayall. That’s one date I would’ve liked to have been in attendance!

Interview by Michael Limnios / Photos by David McDonald

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Interview with Joseph Mojo Morganfield: I think Blues can be a happy song as well: Video, Photos

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Interview with blues singer Joseph “Mojo” Morganfield – Muddy Waters‘ youngest son is a rising star on the Chicago blues scene.

How has the Blues music influenced your views of the world and the journeys you’ve taken?

Having Blues at an early age, seeing my father’s trials and tribulations, seeing current events happening in the world…the Blues has made me stronger, with a thick skin, I have learned to hope for the best but prepare for the worst.

How do you describe your music philosophy and songbook? What was the hardest part to be Muddy’s son?

My music is definitely influenced by my father, with a more up to date approach. I don’t necessarily like “old fashioned” Blues – I think Blues can be a happy song as well.

The high expectations of being Muddy’s son – people compare me to Muddy. They need to realize there is only one Muddy Waters. I am trying to make a way for Mojo Morganfield.

Which meetings have been the most important experiences? What was the best advice anyone ever gave you?

Bob Margolin – knowing him as a kid and performing with him as an adult – we have an unbreakable bond.
Best advise was from my father – he taught me to be true to myself – to be me – people are going to like you or they’re not but you have to be true to yourself.

What do you miss most nowadays from the blues of the past? What are your hopes and fears for the future of?

I miss the stories and comraderies – when a musician was a musician and didn’t have to be in your band to perform on stage. I miss traveling with my band – now there are bands waiting for you. My dad would have never gone for that. His band went everywhere with him.

That the Blues will continue – we need to reach out to youth, to continue to find and encouraged young talent.

Why do you think that Delmark Records continues to generate such a devoted following?

It is the oldest American Jazz/Blues record label, and its right here in Chicago. With that recognition they can reach a lot of people. That is why I chose Delmark to release my new single “It’s Good to be King”.

What would you say characterizes Chicago blues scene in comparison to other US local scenes and circuits?

Chicago Blues is the capital of Blues – founded in Mississippi, but different in St Louis and Tennessee, made more of an urban sound in Chicago. My dad changed the dynamics – Chicago doesn’t use horns, we use a harp instead. Two guitars, a rhythm and a lead, we added a piano. That’s the Chicago way.

What are some of the most important lessons you have learned from your experience in the music paths?

Always have a rehearsal with a new band. Encourage others – especially younger – you never know who is the next Buddy Guy, Muddy Waters, or Howling Wolf. Stay humble.

What is the impact of Blues on the racial and socio-cultural implications? How do you want it to affect people?

The Blues changed. When my father was a young man the blues was a black audience, but when Eric Clapton, the Rolling Stones, and Johnny Winters introduced the world to my father the Blues became white overnight. But the Blues is the foundation of music and crosses cultural borders – no boundaries – meaning age or race.

Let’s take a trip with a time machine, so where and why would you really want to go for a whole day?

1941 – Clarksdale MS to the day Alan Lomax recorded a young Muddy Waters for the Library of Congress. I also want to find Robert Johnson to see how great he was.

Interview By Michael Limnios / Photos by Connie Carroll

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Rehearsal 🎤🎵🎤🎵🎤🎵🎤🎵 - Joseph Mojo Morganfield | Facebook

Rehearsal 🎤🎵🎤🎵🎤🎵🎤🎵 - Joseph Mojo Morganfield | Facebook

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Interview with Peter Veteska: Blues Train Running: Video, Photos

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Interview with East Coast guitarist Peter Veteska & Blues Train: steaming full-bore blues, funk, soul and swinging good time music

What do you learn about yourself from the Blues people and culture? What were the reasons that you started the Blues and Jazz researches?

I grew up in a very tough neighborhood in Brooklyn NY for me Blues is about overcoming adversity and meeting life challenges head on. It is through that experience that I relate to the Blues. Blues is a guttural music, It’s about expressing a feeling despair or jubilation through music. There’s a simplicity to Blues which makes it challenging. Jazz however is a different skill set They are both improvisational. So, for me, fusing the two genres works It’s important to push the boundaries with music other you’re just doing what’s already been done.

How do you describe your songbook and sound? Where does your creative drive come from?

Our songbook consists of originals and covers. Each song is inspired by different things for example Alibi is about me growing up on the streets of NY when I was a teenager. The previous album title is a variation of “Shaken but not stirred’ So I changed the last word to deterred. It addresses my attitude when people criticize our musical approach, some feel that we’re not pure blues, in which I respond, if you don’t push the boundaries it’s gonna sound recycled and rehashed. Let’s face it, if you’re coming out of BB or Albert your just not gonna do it as well they did it.
Fresh, vibrant & diverse …infusing elements of Jazz, Funk & soul Although my sound is guitar driven, I like to add sax & B3 to add more layers to our sound I make a conscious effort to avoid musical clichés. So, we usually cover lesser known Blues classics. When we record a classic, such as T-Bone Shuffle I create my own arrangement and the song takes on a new life. I put much emphasis on my vocals as well. East coast urban blues! Creative drive; I’ve listened to many artists and different genres. Jazz R&B Soul/funk. I get inspiration from numerous artists and life events. I like forging ahead and creating a new sound.

How do you describe new album “Grass Ain’t Greener On The Other Side” sound and songbook?

This is my fifth album. The previous albums were pushing the blues envelope a bit. I was injecting some jazz & funk and found I was straying from the pureness of the blues. With this album, my approach was different – most of the songs stay true to the blues genre, and none of the tracks were previously rehearsed. We did them live in the studio with one or two quick rehearsals and on some tracks the rehearsal was the actual take with minimum overdubs. I want the songs to sound live and have energy. I also did away with my pedals to get a more organic and less overdriven sound – except for the title track. As for the song book, I wrote five songs and co-wrote the sixth. There was a huge change that took place in my life, and love and passion played a large part in the songs’ inspiration, lyrically and musically.

Are there any memories from “Grass Ain’t Greener On The Other Side” studio sessions which you’d like to share with us?

A few studio sessions stand out. I asked Mikey Junior to join us for two songs. When he arrived, he marveled at the sight of an original 59 Fender Bassman amp. He started playing through it and his energy level just blew through the roof. He used this on the opening track, “Am I Wrong.”

The second was the session with Delaware bluesman Roger Girke who contributed co vocals and guitar on “Heartbreaker.” It was just a fun session – the musical chemistry was great as we worked through different tempos and final arrangements. That session also included some stellar session work from drummer Alex D ‘Agnese, bassist Coo Moe Jhee and B3 legend Jeff Levine who laid down a live killer solo and intro. During much of the session work, our drummer Alex was battling a serious decease and still showed up and gave 100%, in my opinion doing some of his finest drum work.

What touched (emotionally) you from Ahmet Ertegun’s Heartbreaker and Willie Cobb’s You Don’t Love Me?

It’s usually the groove that captivates me. The Ray Charles version of “Heartbreaker” is such a great groove and I loved his vocal approach. That’s what moved me. I think it’s a mistake to try to recreate what a master has laid down, which is why I took it in a different direction. The Allman Brothers version of “You Don’t Love Me” is the version that inspired me as a guitarist in the early to mid-70s. This song for me was huge, especially Duane’s playing and the way they jammed on it. We opened up the song in the extended outro. The energy of the rhythm section picked up a few notches and the back and forth with Jeff’s amazing B3 playing was sublime.

What do you love most and what is the hardest part of writing a song? How do you want it to affect people?

Personally, I don’t find writing to be difficult unless I force the issue. Most of my recorded original songs flow out of me and are initially written in 30 minutes or less. I then work on them for about 2 weeks and fine tune every aspect of the song. My favorite part is once we record the backing track. Once that is complete l go back and do my finished vocal and guitar tracks. At this point it becomes very gratifying. I do however enjoy the whole process. Obviously, each song is different – some songs are strong rhythmically, others melodically. Above all, I want the audience to be moved by the song.

If you could change one thing in the musical world and it would become a reality, what would that be?

More emphasis on the music and less about the image.

Are there any memories from gigs, jams, open acts and studio sessions which you’d like to share with us?

We’ve recorded four studio albums and all four have been recorded at Shorefire Recording Studio. Mixed, engineered and co-produced by the owner, Joseph DeMaio. During the recording process you need an independent ear that can guide and advise you in an objective way. Joe has provided that for us and has become an extension of the band. You go into the studio with preconceived ideas, some work and some don’t. I rely on Joe for his musical input because his wealth of experience Is invaluable. He is respectful of the artist and knows when and when not to offer his opinion.

What are some of the most important lessons you have learned from your paths in the music circuits and roads?

To stay humble, be kind to the people you meet. Life is a big circle. Most musicians are very passionate about their music and don’t take criticism well, so don’t offer it.

Do you consider the Blues & Jazz a specific music genre and artistic movement or do you think it’s a state of mind?

Jazz & blues do overlap each other, but they are certainly two separate genres. Obviously, there’s more complexity and skill with Jazz. Jazz players play all the chord changes when soloing. The first- and second-generation blues artist played mostly pentatonic scales while soloing. There’s a simplicity and yet a complexity to that style of playing. Many of today’s blues players play the changes. That’s how I approach it. When your soloing frames out the chords it has much more melodic content. Bending & vibrato is also very important in blues playing. Blues is certainly more feel.

Which acquaintances have been the most important experiences? What was the best advice anyone ever gave you?

I met many fine musicians mostly at various blues jams. Two people in particular helped me by giving me guidance & advice. Bob DelRosso who is an incredible blues guitarist helped me with my tone & discussing the importance of dynamics. His feel & pocket is second to none and always plays in the moment. Ernie W also gave me immeasurable advice by telling the importance of being a good rhythm guitarist and slowing down on my solos and landing them correctly less is more, this applies to most creative things music, art, architecture etc.

What do you miss most nowadays from the blues of past? What are your hopes and fears for the future of?

As is with country music the blues music today is infusing other genres of music. Rock, jazz, funk country etc. some of it is done quite well but much of it strays off too far from blues. It’s important that we don’t dilute what the first-generation blues greats created. I’m all for pushing the envelope but we must respect the past.

What has made you laugh and what touched (emotionally) you from local NYC blues scene?

NY Blues Hall of Fame the Criteria they used for induction was unexpected. I was inducted after 4 years on the musical scene although I was deeply honored I’m not sure if it was deserved at the time.

How has the Blues and Jazz music influenced your views of the world and the journeys you’ve taken?

Blues music as I’m discovering is like a big family. Weather on a local level or national there’s tremendous camaraderie and some very interesting Individuals.

What is the impact of Blues music and culture to the racial, political, and socio-cultural implications?

I think it’s fair to say at least from my perspective most blues guys & gals’ politics lean to the left. Blues emanates from black culture who struggled & suffered in America where there was a lot of racial tension. I see many of today’s blues musicians DJ’s & publishers speak out against our establishment in FB posts. I think they have an impact.

Let’s take a trip with a time machine, so where and why would you really want to go for a whole day?

Witness live & in person a young BB King live at the Regal in that Legendary Concert. The passion & energy that he played with electrified the audience It was the birth of the electric blues.

Interview by Michael Limnios / Photos by Patti Martz

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Interview with Boris Hrepić Hrepa & Antonija Vrgoč Rola: The bridges of music: Video, Photos

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Interview with Boris Hrepić Hrepa & Antonija Vrgoč Rola of Sunnysiders: celebrating their 10th anniversary with a new album titled ‘The Bridges’

How has the Blues and Rock influenced your views of the world and the journeys you’ve taken?

Rola: Love for blues and rock is definitely a foundation of mine views of the world. The world around us is filled with numerous of different way of living, but the world of music, and blues and rock especially is one of the best and purest. That love defines me. Singing has been a great love of mine since early childhood. I was a member of several children’s choirs, and at home I sang along with the radio turned on all day long. The radio also played all night long so I probably sang in my sleep too. I learned a lot about rock from my elder brother who was a big fan of ZZ Top and other hard blues rock bands, but I started to listen more classic blues when I met Boris. I can’t imagine even a day without music, the music that connects people all over the world.

How do you describe Sunnysiders sound, music philosophy and songbook? What do you love most working with Boris?

Rola: The first thing about our music is not even music, it’s lyrics. Our first time in Memphis in 2011, when we passed to semifinals, everybody told us that our lyrics were fresh and funny. We knew well that in Memphis we can’t compete with our virtuosity and perfect blues, so we wrote original and different songs and we played it with our style. When Boris picks up the guitar, he always plays something new, composing a chord progression or a riff, and it is not always good and original, but when it is good I say ‘stop, this sound good for a song’. I’m sort of a filter for his everyday composing.

How do you describe “The Bridges” sound and songbook? Where does your creative drive come from?

Hrepa: I recorded 18 albums in my rock and blues career, but this one was the fastest and easiest one I ever did. We, along with our friend and producer Leo, made a decision to mark our Sunnysiders 10th anniversary with recording an album The Bridges with lot of our friends as guests. We made a list of guest and then selected or wrote a songs for them. Almost every song was tailor written with our guests in mind, and with that kind of thoughts it is easy to write a song. We began recording the album in the beginning of November 2019 and finished it mid January 2020. The basic structure of songs was recorded at Sound Station Studio in Zagreb, while our guests did their parts in various homes or professional studios, located from Manchester to Shanghai. The music was, is, and it will always be one of the strongest, easiest, deepest and fastest connections between people no matter where they come from, how different they are, how old they are, what languages they speak and what skin colour they are. These connections are The Bridges.

Are there any memories from The Bridges studio sessions which you’d like to share with us?

Hrepa: The whole idea of album came after the last Thrill Blues Festival. The day after we took a trip to Split (capital of Dalmatia) with Manu Lanvin, a French bluesman and a headliner of the festival. We also visited our best man Miki who has a studio in Split where we showed Manu a song that was written with him in mind. He was thrilled, and he grabbed one of the guitars from the studio and recorded a crunchy riff and a solo. He said ‘Yeah’ and asked for more, but we had just this song in our new basket.

Are there any memories from gigs, jams, open acts and studio sessions which you’d like to share with us?

Rola: Last January, the Blues Hall of Fame member, British guitarist, singer and songwriter Norman Beaker and his trio recorded 18 songs for their new album at the Sound Station Studio in Zagreb. I had the honor of being invited to sing backing vocals and play tambourine on several songs. Especially focused on playing the tambourine, I didn’t want to fall out of the rhythm and and spoil the heavy groove that Norman, John and Leo recorded. I was sure it would take me a few tries until I got it right, but after the first take everyone was thrilled with my dedication and precision that they nicknamed me a Deadly Tambourine. The next day at a joint lunch as a joke they worried about my arm muscles because of the great enthusiasm while shooting tambourines. Couple of days ago in one review of our new album they wrote that I play mean tambourine. I like that.

How started the thought of Thrill Blues Festival (Croatia)? What is the hardest part of make a blues festival in Europe?

Hrepa: At November of 2017 I got a call from Darko, a guy from Trilj who is popular Croatian musician and also in music business. He had just read my book “I found a very good band”, a book about my passion for music, and there was so much about the blues in it. He came up to idea of organizing a music festival in his hometown and he asked me about a blues festival. My grandmother was from Trilj, so I know the place, the park, the river and the bridge, and I said this was a great idea, and I was sure it would work. It is not easy to make a blues festival anywhere in Europe, but here in Croatia is especially hard. It is easier in Norway, the Nederlands, France, they have a lot of blues clubs and strong blues scene, and Croatia is also at crossroads of western and eastern culture. The blues is here, but on the margins. The Thrill Blues Festival has a strong team of fighters, so we made a surprisingly good festival.

Are there any memories from the Thrill Blues Festival which you’d like to share with us?

Hrepa: There is a one from last year’s festival that I often retell. It was around 3 A.M., the afterparty at backstage just finished and I was sitting with Harrison Kennedy from Canada and James Perri from Chicago. We were tired but satisfied. Then, at the other bench across us, I saw a huge local hillbilly guy. He had a scary look, but he was just sitting and staring at us with a big missing tooth smile. He called me and asked me if he could take a picture with Harrison and James. I said no problem (who will say no to that kind of guy). After the picture taken he told me: „Thank you for organizing this! I never ever heard this kind of music, the blues, but this is the best music in the whole world!“ … And this is the best compliment I’ve ever got.

What do you miss most nowadays from the blues of the past? What are your hopes and fears for the future of?

Rola: I wish I’d lived in the 50s or 60s. I love that period, I enjoy watching blues documentaries from that time, but right now I am missing everything not that long ago, I miss time before corona came, concerts, festivals, traveling, hanging around with our blues friends.

If you could change one thing in the musical world and it would become a reality, what would that be?

Hrepa: Mmm, a hard question. There is a lot of things in musical world that can be better, but I am doing my best to share a good vibe with my music and everything, and that is all I can do. I would like to bring back many great people and musicians who passed away but this is beyond my abilities.

What are some of the most important lessons you have learned from your experience in the music paths?

Hrepa: When we were first time in Memphis, at the 2011 IBC, I joined one big jam at the Tin Roof Blues Club. It was a dream coming true, playing on Beale Street with Afro-American blues musicians. I’d waited my whole life for that moment, to grab a guitar and play. When my turn came I immediately started to play licks throughout the whole song. One guy from brass section, a trumpet player, leaned forward to me and told me quietly to slow down, not to rush, and that I have to wait for a signal from singer who was always the master of ceremony. I stopped, and I follow the singer. It doesn’t seem like a big lesson, but for me it was.

Let’s take a trip with a time machine, so where and why would you really want to go for a whole day?

Rola: There is a one special moment in history of blues where I would like to be. I would set up clock in Delorian on June 26 (also the date of our son Tibon birthday, 1933, around midnight, in one special Chicago nightclub. I would lean on the bar, drinking whiskey, chilling and watching cutting contest, a guitar battle, between Big Bill Broonzy and Memphis Minnie. Sure, before that I would pay a bet on Minnie.

Interview by Michael Limnios / Photos by Milka Grozdanic & Jerry T

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Interview with Lucas Spinosa: Louisiana music is here to stay: Video, Photos

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Interview with Louisiana Music Hall of Famer, Lucas Spinosa: a keyboard player with a remarkable talent for songwriting.

How has the Blues and Louisiana’s music influenced your views of the world and the journeys you’ve taken?

Being born and raised in south Louisiana, it’s music is a natural educator. I grew up being infused with blues and other styles from the south. It has helped me to embrace others and learn from diversity. Music in the south has become the foundation of my everyday life.

How started the thought of “Friends & Legends of Louisiana” project? How do you describe album’s music philosophy?

One of my closest friends and music confidants, Mike David, and I were researching new project ideas. We wanted to produce something that headlined some of the best talents in south Louisiana. Something that would really show off the melting pot of sounds that we grew up on. Luckily, between the two of us we had plenty of contacts. We were fortunate to enlist some of the best vocalists and musicians around. The album represents the diverse sounds and abilities of each performer. I wrote each song in particular for each vocalist and directed each player to enrich the south Louisiana vibe.

Which meetings have been the most important experiences?

I was lucky enough to meet Stevie Wonder when I played as a studio musician early in my career. He and I sat at the piano together and played songs from his album “The Key of Life”. I realized then through our conversations that music really was the key to life. I was able to meet a variety of artists through my sponsorship with Coors Brewery in the 1990’s. I was able to travel the country and perform openings for various artists (Tracy Lawrence, Tracy Byrd, Martina McBride, Ray Charles) which truly helped me to grow as a musician and performer.

What was the best advice anyone ever gave you?

When I was a young man, I was told by my peers “to always try to play with other musicians that are better than you”; so, you can learn from them. To this day, I surround myself with the best of the best and it truly pushes me to write, produce and perform at the highest level.

Are there any memories from gigs, jams, open acts and studio sessions which you’d like to share with us?

In 1996, I was fortunate to play a show for the Olympics in Atlanta, Georgia. The show included Tracy Lawrence, Waylon Jennings, Ray Charles and others. It was such a great show and gave me opportunities to observe and gain perspective as a musician.

What do you miss most nowadays from the music of the past? What are your hopes and fears for the future of?

I miss the traditional sounds of Otis Redding, Bobby “Blue” Bland, Conway Twitty, BB King … These are sounds that really define musical excellence. Some of the sounds today, in my opinion, are simply not musical at all. My biggest fear is those sounds will become the new norm and the true old timers will fade.

What would you say characterizes Louisiana’s scene in comparison to other US scenes? What touched (emotionally) you?

Louisiana music is here to stay. A lot of music scenes come and go. But the sounds of Louisiana … the New Orleans jazz, the R&B, the Swamp Pop and Rock ‘n’ Roll of Louisiana … will forever be in the history books. We here in the south have an emotional bond with our music and will keep it in tradition and not be moved by progressives.

What are some of the most important lessons you have learned from your experience in the music paths?

Stay true to yourself, don’t try to be something you are not. Do not let the outside forces try to change you to something they want you to be. Each person is unique and should always be confident in who they are. I’m built from rhythm & blues, swamp pop, traditional country and rock ‘n’ roll; that’s what I’m made of.

What is the impact of music on the socio-cultural implications? How do you want it to affect people?

I want my music to make people smile. If through my music I can make people fell good and be happy; it’s makes me feel full in my heart.

Let’s take a trip with a time machine, so where and why would you really want to go for a whole day?

I would travel to the future … I would like go tour overseas with the “Friends & Legends of Louisiana” band. Spread the gumbo of sounds throughout the world!

Interview by Michael Limnios

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Korona Blues in Sorlandet with guests from Australia and the USA: Photos, Video

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September originally set up a program with guests from Australia and the USA in Fiona Boyes and Heather Crosse respectively in addition to good Norwegian names like Steinar Albrigtsen and Monika Nordli, Nave & The Ghost Collectors and Jolly Jumper & Big Moe and The Jimbo Jambo Band. It was not supposed to go that way, but it was a concert.

The coronavirus led to cancellations, and it was unclear for a while if there would be any blues at Brekstad at all this weekend. But the gang behind the festival did not give up so easily. They put on a replacement concert, a so-called corona concert, at BarRock in Brekstad on Saturday 26 September. This was a double concert with Mats Nerli and Jolly Jumper & Big Moe and The Jimbo Jambo Band. Only 70 tickets were displayed at the door, and there was table service and full focus on arranging an infection-free event. The nightclub BarRock has for many years collaborated with Ørland Bluesklubb and stood out once again with fast and friendly service.

Koronablues på Ørlandet

Koronablues på Ørlandet

Jolly Jumper & Big Moe and The Jimbo Jambo Band at BarRock.

Mats Nerli

Mats Nerli from Istad outside Molde started the evening at 20. Mats was well described in the previous edition of Bluesnews after he played at Skjærgårdsblues on Veiholmen outside Smøla this summer. Mats delivered the same concept at Brekstad. On the repertoire were his own songs in Norwegian language costume, tied together with good stories. He was very well received on Veiholmen, but the concept suited Intimate BarRock even better than at the large community center on Veiholmen where the festival was forced to hold the concert due to infection control. Mats captivated the audience for 90 minutes with a small warning early on that talking during the concert was not so popular on stage. And from then on the audience listened.

Mats Nerli (pictured above) solo differs from his band Nerli There which is an americana / rock band that mostly sings in English. Solo, he appears more in the direction of a singer / songwriter. Both melancholy and humor are prominent in lyrics and performance. He should be ready for a larger audience, even though he himself says he is a little unsure whether, for example, easterners will understand the Romsdal dialect. There should be absolutely nothing in the way of that, and organizers across the country can be sure that guests will appreciate both lyrics, songs and performances.

Jolly Jumper & Co

At 10 pm, the trip had come to Jolly Jumper & Big Moe and The Jimbo Jambo Band. The band hardly needs any further presentation, and especially not at Ørland Blues Festival where the duo Kjell Inge Brovoll and Jan Erik Moe have been involved every year since the beginning. It will be 21 years in a row! Daniel Røssing on piano and Arne Skognes on drums complement the duo perfectly. The band delivers sky-high quality in several blues genres, and it was a playful set of 90 minutes where, among other things, Pengegaloppen by Vidar Sandbeck was also served in a light blues format. The boys were not allowed to leave the stage until an extra number was given.

It was probably not the big audience visit that the organizer hoped for, but the artists still delivered a fantastic concert. Primus engine and sound engineer Syver Srøbka said after the concert that it was a pity that people do not show up when you try to arrange something in the local environment that in terms of quality absolutely meets goals and should be to your liking. He still wanted to thank the attendees and the artists who really delivered this evening.

In the neighboring village Råkvåg there was the same evening a blues concert with local Blue Aspic, but since there was so limited capacity in both places (in Råkvåg there was room for 50), it was not expected that this would create major problems for any of the organizers.

We wish the festival good luck with the planning of next year’s festival. And then the blues jam, one of Norway’s best jam sessions, is back as well. See you at Brekstad in September 2021.

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Primus engine in Ørland Blues Club, Syver Srøbka.

Primus motor i Ørland Bluesklubb, Syver Srøbka.

Primus motor i Ørland Bluesklubb, Syver Srøbka.

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