Interview with Tia Carroll: West Coast Blues is a thing people: Video, Photos



Post Views:
8,114

Interview with Bay Area blues singer supreme, Tia Carroll – from the heart with passion, emotion, and warmth. Tia’s new album YOU GOTTA HAVE IT! is her first stateside studio recording of strong original blues and soul, and interesting well-chosen covers.

How has the Blues and Gospel music influenced your views of the world and the journeys you’ve taken?

That is quite a question and I’m really glad you asked. Gospel music gives me hope and makes me feel protected and safe. Gospel music lets me know that God is always with me, no matter what I may be going through so that means He is with us no matter what the world is going through. It’s a powerful music that makes it’s way through almost all of the genres of music in one way or another. It cannot be denied, nor can it be held in any box that can be checked off on an application for a loan. Gospel music is fair and just and that is because of who it ultimately represents and not who represents it. So, my views of the world as far as gospel music goes it bright and loving.
Blues music is underrepresented by its lineage. Where and why blues started is a long but well-known story. The journey that the blues has taken is a wild and crazy, sometimes tragic ride. It almost mirrors inequality and that is a hard thing to have to say and hear. I feel like the blues is shrinking and it is my job as well as others like me to help keep it’s shape. We have to work together to preserve cultures and traditions and many have forgotten that or forgotten how to do it. My views of the world as it pertains to blues music…We have work to do.

Currently you’ve been working with Little Village’s Jim Pugh. How did that relationship come about?

I always heard Jim’s name mentioned over the years and then we played on some shows over recent years however we never really had time to stop long enough to say more than “hey!” and “ok, see ya later”. We were always on stage or on our way in or out. A good problem to have but not so great for socializing. It is an absolute pleasure working with Jim on this project. He has great insight and a feel for the music, yet I am free to do my thing. You can’t ask for more than that.

How do you describe “You Gotta Have It” sound and songbook? What touched you from the album’s sessions?

Most of all I was so excited to see my original songs come to life. The musicians were so caring to keep the original feel and then enhance the sound. Laying down guitar, bass, keys and piano all being kept tight with the beat and we just went for it. Most of the songs were one or two takes in the studio, it was like magic! It was however strange that as we came together to listen to what we had done we can’t really see each other’s faces as we are all masked up. That of course is a memory that may very well stay current and into our futures.

What do you love most about the live performance? What do you think is key to an exciting live show?

I love to sing, and I love to connect with the audience. As you give energy you also get some back from the listeners. Music evokes emotions and delivery of that musical note, vocal note lyric or drumbeat can spark a memory that leads to an emotion. Good or bad we are connecting with one another and I love that about live performances. People like to see interaction on stage, so I think movement makes an exciting show, live or prerecorded.

Which meetings have been the most important experiences for you?

The most important are the meetings with the musicians. I have been blessed to meet some of the most talented musicians and honored to play on the same stage with them. Here in the states, South America, Mexico and Europe I have been invited into homes and family dinners and made to feel welcome.

Are there any memories from Sugar Pie DeSanto which you’d like to share with us?

Oh, that woman is a treasure chest of wisdom and knowledge. Traveling with Jimmy McCracklin and Sugar Pie for a tour in Italy a few years back, I will never forget how I watched Sugar just pick up the entire audience and then place them right in the palm of her hand. All eyes on Sugar.

What would you say characterizes Bay Area blues scene in comparison to other local US scenes?

People say we are just too happy here in California to have the blues, West Coast Blues is a thing people, it is a thing. We may be living here in the beautiful Bay Area however, some of our parents were born in the South or on the East Coast and as kids were influenced by our parent’s music and what was playing on the radio. There is a wide range of “Blues” here in this Bay Area.

What are some of the most important lessons you have learned from your experience in the music paths?

Be Patient! Be Patient! Be Patient! If you are in it for the money, get out! Sing, write or play because you love it. Negotiate, don’t compromise. Compromise don’t negotiate.

What is the impact of Blues on the racial and socio-cultural implications? How do you want to affect people?

The blues are under represented by the bloodline they came from and that makes the blues misunderstood and not viewed as a powerful tool to promote change. We have work to do to if we want to be seen as movers and shakers in the music industry. Movers and shakers have resources to get things done outside of the music industry. The movers and shakers in the blues are a small pool so that means somebody has to reach out and pull the next one up until we are seen as a larger segment of voices with plenty of fans with voices. It’s not all about the numbers but is about the number of voices that can be loud enough to be heard by the folks who make the rules. I want people to hear the name Tia Carroll and instantly think about kindness and love and laughter and even a little sadness. When people hear me sing the words to the songs it will cause one of those emotions to pop up and hopefully bring some joy.

Interview by Michael Limnios / Photos by Kief Savage

[embedded content]

Spread the love

  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

All images & transcripts are of Fair Use and copyright to their respected & collective owners. Some images copyright AP, Clipart.com.

Interview with Martin Lang: The Bad Man songbook came together little by little: Video, Photos



Post Views:
8,208

Interview with harmonica virtuoso Martin Lang, captures the wailing urgency that makes Chicago blues harp famous worldwide

How has the Blues (and people of) influenced your views of the world and the journeys you’ve taken?

The blues musicians and people I met in Chicago had a great time in the world they lived in, very individualistic and vibrant. I liked the way they looked at life, they could be who they really were. That’s how I see the music, and being a blues musician; it’s all about figuring out who you really are. Not who people say you are, or who you’d like to be. The real you, the real me.

What do you learn about yourself from the blues and what does the blues mean to you?

The blues to me is a way of life. A way of seeing life, and making music from that. I learned about myself that the blues is a form of music that’s so beautiful and great that it doesn’t need much help from me.

How do you describe your sound, music philosophy and songbook? Where does your creative drive come from?

I think of my sound as real old-style Chicago harp blues. Tone, groove, and economy. In terms of this record, I had everything on the line. It was do it or die. I had to change gears. It really was past time for me to do this.

How do you describe “Bad Man” songbook? Do you have any interesting stories about the making of the new album?

The Bad Man songbook came together little by little. I had a couple ideas for numbers, but I hadn’t really tried them. The band deserves a whole lot of credit. I had some deep cuts, Dick Shurman picked a couple, there’s some insider stuff.’Reefer Head Man’ is arranged like Willie Smith’s ‘It’s a Hard Hard Way’ – and just about all of us have worked with Willie.

How do you think that you have grown as an artist since you first started? What has remained the same about your music-making process?

I think I’ve grown rhythmically and my phrasing’s become looser. When I was young, I had energy and power and aggression. Now I’m in better control. The music making process is basically the same, it’s simple. I write the songs, sing the melody, the band falls in. I’ll get inspired by something I hear, usually early in the morning.

What do you hope is the message of your music? What do you hope people continue to take away from your songs?

I hope most of all that people feel that my music is honest. I hope that it gives people the idea that there’s some kind of hope for the evolution of the traditional blues sound.

What are some of the most important lessons you have learned from your experience in the music paths?

The most important thing I learned was that it is in letting go that there’s freedom in the music, not in holding on to more control. If you try to impose yourself on the music, your reward will be less of a positive impact. I had to learn that, to let the music breathe, which involves letting go of control. It’s very Zen, but I’m not usually a Zen guy lol…

Why do you think that Chicago Blues Scene continues to generate such a devoted following?

Chicago style music sounds (when it’s right) sexy and dangerous and cool. That’s why people always like it, and why it has such devoted followers, I think.

Are there any memories from gigs, jams, open acts and studio sessions which you’d like to share with us?

I remember once being onstage alone with Eddie Taylor, Jr., in Amsterdam, which is a big venue. It was just us two, no bass, no other guitar except Eddie, no drums. Just harp and guitar, and I had a big amp and my little Electro Voice mike I’d gotten from Fishman at the Delta Fish Market. Eddie did Crawling King Snake and I remember thinking “This is gonna be hard” in terms of blending the sounds of my harp and his guitar, because he was still playing a lot of the top parts. But it worked out beautiful.

Which meetings have been the most important experiences for you? What was the best advice anyone ever gave you?

The most important person I met here in Chicago was definitely Taildragger. I learned a lot about the music from him. Not the harp specifically, about blues music. The best advice I ever heard was to lay back and wait and take your time. I listen to the drummer, play along with him, in most cases.

Are there any memories with Tail Dragger which you’d like to share with us?

I’ve seen Taildragger correctly diagnose what was wrong with a running truck engine by listening to it. His eyes were closed, he had a cigar in his mouth, and he knew what was wrong with it when he opened them.

What do you miss most nowadays from the blues of the past? What are your hopes and fears for the future of?

What I miss most is the black clubs and the Fish Market and the whole West Side blues scene. It was great, as much fun as a person could have. The people in the club were part of the music. It was call and response amongst the musicians but also amongst the musicians and the people. Those people knew about blues. They understood blues. They’re gone, and I miss them. What I hope that blues lives on, in the hearts of the musicians of the future. A great deal can be learned from records. A great deal cannot. As for the future I consider myself realistic but hopeful.

If you could change one thing in the musical world and it would become a reality, what would that be?

Change one thing in the musical world? I’d eliminate bad intonation. That’s a big question!

What touched you from the sound of Harmonica? You studied law and philosophy, how has influenced your views of the world?

Something about the sound of the harp that I heard Little Walter make spoke to me clearly and immediately. It was the clearest thing I ever heard or knew of. I knew almost immediately upon hearing him playing his own stuff for the first time that I wanted to try it. It was exactly like the first hit of a really great drug, the best ever. I heard “My Babe” and completely freaked out. I asked Lee “Little Wolf” Solomon, who I met at Ohio and Hamlin on the West Side, what was the blues? He was from Tallulah, Louisiana. He replied “Cryin’ for your mama. We all be cryin’. Cryin for your mama.”

What is the impact of Blues on the socio-cultural implications? How do you want it to affect people?

Well, I hope music can help people form relationships with those others that are as different from them as I am from someone like Taildragger; in my relationship with him, the subject of race is literally a joke. We know each other well enough to know that we are truly more alike than different, because of the music.

You have run several harmonica clinics all over the Midwest. What touched you from the “Harp Freak” clinics?

I was amazed at the level of passion from harp players all over the Midwest, really. The number of people that honestly wanted to learn more about the traditional way of playing the Chicago blues harp. I had a lot of fun and made many good friends.

Let’s take a trip with a time machine, so where and why would you really want to go for a whole day?

Not that easy a question, but I’ll say a multiple bill featuring Little Walter with the Aces at the Royal Peacock anytime around 1955 or 56. Or maybe Muddy’s early band in Chicago. That’s a tough question!

Interview by Michael Limnios / Photos by Michael Kurgansky

[embedded content]

Spread the love

  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

All images & transcripts are of Fair Use and copyright to their respected & collective owners. Some images copyright AP, Clipart.com.

Interview with R. D. Olson: The blues as always been about expressing emotions and life’s circumstances: Video, Photos

Post Views: 8,311

Interview with Arizona-based blues harpist/vocalist, R. D. Olson – brings high-energy music to fill your soul.

What do you learn about yourself from the Blues people and culture? What does the blues mean to you?

When I was much younger I played with Luther Allison he taught me so much about the blues and while I was with Luther I met and spent time with BB King, Muddy Waters, John Lee Hooker and many others. The blues to me is a living form of communication handed down generation after generation. When your time comes you add your chapter.

What were the reasons that you started the Blues researches? How do you describe your songbook and sound?

My sound is a mix of new and old. I like to mix newer sounding styles with the old anything to keep this musical form alive. As far a research I hung with the men and women that made the music as much as I could.

How has the Blues and Rock n’ Roll culture influenced your views of the world and the journeys you’ve taken?

Music has shaped who I am as a person. I have used music as a platform to express my views, including political and spiritual views.

Where does your lyrics/music creative drive come from? How have you grown as an artist since you first started?

It seems that the songs just come to me. It often appears I am channeling. The art of writing is getting out of your own way, and letting the music flow to you. Over the years I have become more dedicated, and have treated my music as more of a craft, rather than a hobby.

Which acquaintances have been the most important experiences? What was the best advice anyone ever gave you?

I think Luther Allison was my biggest inspiration he taught me the most but also Mojo Buford and Chico Chism also helped me along the way. Keep this music alive and if that means creating sounds and rhythms that younger folks can identify with that’s what I’m doing now. The blues as always been about expressing emotions and life’s circumstances. I write about stuff going on in peoples lives in the here and now.”

What moment changed your life the most? What´s been the highlights in your life and career so far?

The birth of my children, and ending up raising them as a single parent, put a stall on my music career for over 15 years. Then my youngest daughter, Jade, at age 15 said “Didn’t you used to be a musician? Why don’t you go back to what you love?” So at age 58 I took her advice, and began performing live again at a venue called the “The Market Place Cafe” in the Village of Oak Creek- right outside of Sedona, Arizona. As far as my musical career highlights, I value the opportunity to have been band leader for Alligator recording artist, Long John Hunter, as well as Grammy winner Beverly ‘Guitar’ Watkins. I also played with Luther Allison, and had the pleasure of being on the same shows as the likes of BB King, Buddy Guy, Kenny Wayne Shepherd, and many others.

What are some of the most important lessons you have learned from your experience in the music paths?

During my journey in the Blues world that I came up in, my mentors were kind and gracious in sharing their knowledge, and giving tips to those young musicians who were passionate in their love of the Blues. As an older musician now, I try to never forget those lessons I learned as a young man.

What do you miss most nowadays from the blues of past? What are your hopes and fears for the future of?

So many of the old bluesman really were great about giving advice to younger players like myself color was not an issue, keeping the blues alive was. My hope for the future of the blues is to hand it down to the next generation just like it was handed to me. Keep this music alive and if that means creating sounds and rhythms that younger folks can identify with that’s what I’m doing now. The blues as always been about expressing emotions and life’s circumstances. I write about stuff going on in peoples lives in the here and now.

Are there any memories from gigs, jams, open acts and studio sessions which you’d like to share with us?

I was playing an outdoor festival with Luther’s band in 1980 there he introduced me to Muddy Waters, I think I was about 25 years old. Later that day after we had played and Muddy had finished his set I was hanging around back stage with all of the great’s BB King was there Albert King and many others, I was in blues heaven!!

What is the Impact of Blues music and culture to the racial, political and socio-cultural implications?

Blues knows no color at least not with the people I know we never talk about black or white some of the things making news today are not even talked about in my circles. The music binds us together.

Interview by Michael Limnios / Photo by Maile Alday

[embedded content]

Spread the love

  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

All images & transcripts are of Fair Use and copyright to their respected & collective owners. Some images copyright AP, Clipart.com.

Interview with Skylar Rogers: Blues has given us an understanding of the past: Video, Photos

Post Views: 8,276

Interview with Soul Rockin’ Blues singer Skylar Rogers – strong, passionate, and energetic artist.

How has the Blues, Soul and Rock music influenced your views of the world and the journeys you’ve taken?

I tend to feel the vibes of music, as in the physical sound waves. It helps me understand that yes, the world sucks right now, but these genres in particular have taught us well that though times may be bad, we’ll get through, and brighter days are ahead. I’ve dealt with some of my darkest times with the help of music. It’s my therapy. I truly do believe that music survives the worst, and celebrates the best.

How do you describe your sound, music philosophy and songbook? Where does your creative drive come from?

It took some experimentation for me to find my sound! I would describe it as complex as life itself. It’s a never back down, unafraid sound. Hard Headed Woman is an example of this: she knows it’s going to cost her everything, but she refuses to back down. All of my songs reflect something personal. You can’t sing any form of the blues if you haven’t had the blues. Even in future projects, I will still be drawing on personal experiences, even if they’re in the third person.

Are there any memories from gigs, jams, open acts and studio sessions which you’d like to share with us?

One of my favorite moments with my brothers (Blue Diamonds) was the final show before the shutdown, in Springfield, IL. I truly discovered who I was that day. You can see the difference in the pictures from previous shows, and look at the pictures from the Springfield show. Another time was when I was down from having a major surgery. I told the guys that I knew they had other obligations, so I told them if they wanted to go, I wouldn’t have blamed them. Every last one of them said they were with me no matter what. My eyes got sweaty from the onion cutting ninjas. We became more than just a band…we were a family.

What do you miss most nowadays from the blues of the past? What are your hopes and fears for the future of?

I miss the originality. Sounds harsh, but while at the IBC in Memphis, I heard Bobby Rush say, ‘There’s nothing new anymore. It’s all been done before.’ There is so much truth in that. We are simply building on the foundation that the pioneers built for us. Sure, we can rearrange styles, combine genres, add different sounds, etc., but we will never be able to reinvent the wheel. One hope I have for the future is that our blended styles of blues become more acceptable. The genre lines are so blurred at this point, that you can’t hear a song and say, “that’s not blues.” I know there will be purists out there who will look on us with disdain, but if we all played the same thing, how boring would that be?

What would you say characterizes Chicago blues scene in comparison to other local US scenes and circuits?

The Chicago blues scene is all about keeping it simple, and in more intimate settings, one of the exceptions being the House Of Blues, of course. There’s something about that amped harp and guitar being right in your face, and the interaction with the audience that early Chicago blues artists were known for. It’s a party, and everyone was invited!

What does to be a female artist in a Man’s World as James Brown says? What is the status of women in music?

My mother was in a male dominated industry (commercial roofer). I worked in male dominated industries for years: military, truck driver, municipal bus driver, even security. There’s a very delicate balance of hanging with the boys and maintaining your identity as a woman. I watched my mom do it, and learned it from her. Women in music have had to maintain that same balance, and it’s even harder now more than ever: we basically have to fly to get to where a man can walk to. I am proud to say that we ladies are holding our own, and are definitely a force to be reckoned with!!

What is the impact of Blues on the civil & human rights, feminist, political and socio-cultural implications?

Wow, that’s a deep and slightly loaded question. Blues has given us an understanding of the past, which we can use to unite in the present. We truly need to listen to the voices of the past, and listen carefully. It gave the black man a way to voice his struggles that he otherwise would not have the chance to speak of so freely. Blues has shown us that the ladies have paid their dues and have earned the right to stand side by side with the fellas. They’ve done so since the times of Ma Rainey, Bessie Smith, and Gladys Bentley. Now we have Samantha Fish, Annika Chambers, Shemekia Copeland, and, well…lil ol me. Unfortunately, there is an undercurrent of tension between white and black blues artists. I was going to jam with a band on Beale, and was told I better know some black standards. I walked away, angry. What the heck was the difference between a black band and a white band? WHY was there a difference? I was listening to a show on Bluesville, and the dj classified the artist he’d just played as ‘one of the greatest of the white blues players.’ Disgusted, I changed the station. There will always be the debate of who the blues is for, who has the right to play it, and who shouldn’t. My take on it? BLUES IS FOR EVERYONE! Young, old, white, black, polka dotted. Acknowledge where the music came from, and respectfully play to that.

What are some of the most important lessons you have learned from your experience in the music paths?

I’ve learned that this is NOT for the faint of heart!! You’re either all in, or you need to get out. Also, no matter what, you HAVE to be true to who you are. You can’t be afraid to do what you really want. You do it, and people either like it or they don’t. If they don’t oh well…it simply wasn’t for them. I’ve also learned to not take things personally. There’s no time to. You process, decide if it makes you better, great. If not, out the other ear it goes. This is your little company, and YOU are the CEO. You will make bad decisions, after all, you’re human. But you learn, and keep it moving, And lastly, NEVER get comfortable. EVER. Always reach for something higher.

Let’s take a trip with a time machine, so where and why would you really want to go for a whole day?

Just one day? Let me sit and learn from 1990’s Tina Turner. She was the epitome of the overcomer. I would love to hear her talk about how she decided to do something no one would expect her to do: become the Queen of Rock and Roll. I’d love to know what her thought process was, if she immediately walk in her truth, or did it intimidate her? So many questions!!!!! If you ever see this, Queen Tina, let me pick you brain for a day!

Interview by Michael Limnios / Photos by Kay Marie

[embedded content]

Spread the love

  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

All images & transcripts are of Fair Use and copyright to their respected & collective owners. Some images copyright AP, Clipart.com.

Interview with Sam Barlow: Well, music has shaped my entire life: Video, Photos

Post Views: 8,242

Interview with Texas-based multitalented blues musician Sam Barlow, both frontman and session player has spanned a wide array of genres.

How has the Blues and Rock n’ Roll music influenced your views of the world and the journeys you’ve taken?

Well, music has shaped my entire life. I’ve been playing music as long as I can remember and the Blues has always been my driving force, probably the most important thing to me; however, I spent many years on the road playing Country music, as well as Rock and Roll music, and many other genres. Those were journeys in and of themselves. I have enjoyed playing these different genres for many different audiences, in a plethora of different situations over the course of the years, and have made the comment that I am blessed to both literally, and figuratively, wear a different hat every night- so to speak.

How do you think that you have grown as an artist since you first started? Where does your creative drive come from?

That is a very complex question because, as an artist, one thing that we can be assured of is that we will always be better tomorrow than we are today, as long as we keep persevering. I think the Lord has blessed me in being able to find inspiration and growth in places that other people might not and being able to reflect that in the music is something that I strive towards. My creative drive is mainly out of a love for the blues, a little bit of perfectionism, a little bit of spite, definitely a few women, a general curiosity, and a love to “preach” the blues to my juke-joint congregation.

Which meetings have been the most important experiences? What was the best advice anyone ever gave you?

I think by far the most important meeting that I ever had would be with the president of Montrose records and my good friend, Mr. Richard Cagle. He has helped me exponentially grow, both musically and personally. I am blessed and thankful for everything that he, his family, and everyone else at Montrose Records has done for me! The best advice anyone ever gave me would have to be the advice that I received from my maternal grandmother, Cristina Sonnen, “Anything they can do; you can do better.”

Are there any memories from gigs, jams, open acts, and studio sessions which you’d like to share with us?

I think some of the more recent and important memories to me would be the studio sessions when recording my debut album Faith in the Blues. I traveled to the mountains of Ruidoso, to the Montrose Records studio, with four of my best friends/worthy constituents who also happened to be my bandmates and recorded what I think is just an amazing album. I’m so proud of every part of it. Much praise to Joe Seltzer, Dave Hamilton, the late Tony Movsesian, Izzy Aguirre, Annika Chambers, Erwin Solbach, Maribel Rubio, and Michael Scott for their superb contributions. As far as a memory, that came when we recorded the final track of my album, Valentine Special. We were standing in a circle, clapping and playing-Tony playing washboard and I on guitar-and everything cut live. That was an amazing moment and really summed up the energy of the entire production.

What do you miss most nowadays from the music of the past? What are your hopes and fears for the future?

I miss the impulsivity, the “live” energy, the attention to detail, the ability to choke interesting and different sounds out of analog instruments, and the childlike nature that we used to have about musical curiosity and the freedom that came with the Blues, Jazz, and other truly American musical art forms. My hope for the future is that the Blues will thrive in ways that is yet to be seen…that it will be magnified to the fullness of glory and that I will be instrumental in bringing it forth.

What would you say characterizes Texas blues scene in comparison to other US local scenes and circuits?

I think one of the things that might characterize the Texas Blues scene would be hospitality. I’ve never been to a blues jam in Texas where I was made to feel less than welcome. In fact, whenever you listen to the old records of Albert Collins, Freddie King, and Lightning Hopkins and alike– you feel compelled and attracted to their music. There is, however; another side to that and that would be virtuosity.

I think that Texas Blues musicians have been known for many years to generally show “the pinnacle” of musicianship in their performances and I’m very proud to have learned and played alongside so many people that embody that. And lastly, I could not forget to mention “soul”…Blues soaked with Soul.

What are some of the most important lessons you have learned from your experience in the music paths?

To trust your gut and to do your own thing. No matter what- stay in your lane and keep pushing towards your goals.

What is the impact of music on the socio-cultural implications? How do you want it to affect people?

I feel that when those of us in ‘The True Blue Band’ play music for audiences and when listeners hear our record, the goal is to make people happy. My personal mission is to be the catalyst that spreads enough happiness so that everyone has “Faith in the blues.”

Let’s take a trip with a time machine, so where and why would you really want to go for a whole day?

I’d like to drive a DeLorean, 88 miles per hour into the future, to the day that I win my 10th or 11th Grammy.

Interview by Michael Limnios

[embedded content]

Spread the love

  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  • 1
  •  
  •  
  •  
  • 1
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  • 1
  •  

All images & transcripts are of Fair Use and copyright to their respected & collective owners. Some images copyright AP, Clipart.com.

Interview with Eb Davis: The music will get a fair shake in the industry and my fear is that it will not: Video, Photos

Post Views: 8,624

Interview with charismatic showman Eb Davis, the Blues Ambassador of Arkansas has been delighting audiences all over the world.

How has the Blues and Soul music influenced your views of the world and the journeys you’ve taken?

My views of the world in the many journeys that I have taken has been greatly shaped and formed by having been lucky enough to be a part of a very special community. The community of Blues and Soul music. In many parts of the world I have met and formed many contacts and friends by being a part of this special community of people.

How do you think that you have grown as an artist since you first started and what has remained the same?

I have grown as an artist over the years by learning more and more about my heritage and the people that looks like me who has gone and left this world impacted legacy. The thing that has remained the same is my love of and dedication to this treasure left to me.

Arkansas, Memphis, NYC. What are the differences and similarities between the US local scenes?

When we compare Arkansas, Memphis and New York. Some of the differences I found. Many of the blues greats (Albert King, Son Seals, Robert Junior Lockwood, Sonny boy Williamson, just to name a few, all immigrated from Arkansas. In my youth the two main hubs of blues and Soul activities were in Helena Arkansas and Memphis Tennessee. With Beale street in Memphis being a magnet attracting people from numerous other cities and towns. New York City had a very good music scene but was never known as a Blues Mecca. During my stay in New York I had to work a lot in the Soul or Soul Blues Genre.

Are there any memories from your new album Treasures From The Vault studio sessions which you’d like to share with us?

One of the most outstanding memories from treasures from the vault is spending a day in the studio with so many good musicians and listening to their various experiences in the music industry and their various takes on the music that we call the Blues.

What do you miss most nowadays from the music of past? What are your hopes and fears for the future of?

The thing I miss most from the music of the past is the sheer dedication that was brought to it. When people played it just for the love of and dedication to the art form. My hopes for the future is that the music will get a fair shake in the industry and my fear is that it will not.

If you could change one thing in the musical world and it would become a reality, what would that be?

If I could change just one thing and it became a reality it would be all of these rockers, pretenders, blues wannabes, etc. calling themselves Blues Artists with absolutely no knowledge of or dedication to, the art form.

How has the blues business changed over the years since you first started in music?

It has changed in the was that now there are not the hundreds of venues that existed when I started out and other forms of music has come along and basically pushed the Blues onto the back burner. When I started out the Blues was played from one end of the country to the other.

Some music styles can be fads but the Blues is always with us. Why do think that is?

So long as there are people there will be Blues because it is the only music that speaks across the boundaries, languages, cultures, and experiences of the human race.

What are some of the most important lessons you have learned from your experience in the music paths?

One of the most outstanding lessons I have learned in the business is the power of music, especially Blues, to touch people on a very personal and emotional level. Plus, the Power that it has in making and cementing friendships.

What is the impact of music on the civil rights and socio-cultural implications? How do you want it to affect people?

I would want and hope that music would be listened to with open ears and minds because music speaks to a wide array of socio-cultural implications.

Let’s take a trip with a time machine, so where and why would you really want to go for a whole day?

If I could take a trip in a time machine it would be back to the days of my youth hanging out on Beale street in Memphis watching greats like little junior Parker, BB King, Roscoe Gordon, and the magnificent Bobby Blue Bland. All just hanging out on Beale street.

Interview by Michael Limnios

[embedded content]

Spread the love

  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

All images & transcripts are of Fair Use and copyright to their respected & collective owners. Some images copyright AP, Clipart.com.

Interview with Joanna Connor: There is a big concern that the blues is whitewashed in a sense: Video, Photos

Post Views: 8,226

Interview with Chicago-based slide guitar virtuoso and singer-songwriter, Joanna Connor – one of the reigning Queens of blue rock guitar.

How has the Blues and Rock culture influenced your views of the world and the journeys you’ve taken?

I’ve lived the life of a musician for almost my entire life. My views of the world were always inclusive, and curious and fascinated with cultures and art and spirituality, so bring an artist fit into that life view. I have seen a lot of sexism in my business and experienced a lot of it when I was younger, it’s a very me dominated field. The younger generations have brought new abs I believe, better and more accepting attitudes and more women and girls are making music abs in the business.

How do you think that you have grown as an artist since you first started and what has remained the same?

I have grown as an artist, as I have grown as a human, what is inside is reflected in my music and creative process. I know myself more, I have untangled parts of myself, so I feel as artist o am more expressive.

How do you describe 4801 South Indiana Ave. songbook on Joe Bonamassa’s new independent blues record label Keeping The Blues Alive on February 26, 2021? What has made you laugh from album’s sessions?

We chose the album title ‘4801 South Indiana Avenue’ because it was the actual street address of the hallowed funky blues sanctuary ‘Theresa’s Lounge.’ We want the listener to open that door, walk in and feel to their core some of the magic that a place like that brought night after night. It was an honor to bring this to you, the listener.. Joe Bonamassa has a dry and quirky sense of humor, which I adore. The songbook is a variety in styles of blues and nit typical covers, it’s a bit deeper in the artists catalogs

Which meetings have been the most important experiences? Are there any memories which you’d like to share?

I was supposed to go backstage abs meet Stevie Ray Vaughan at what turned out to be his last show, and o declined, saying, no I will meet him when we play on a fest somewhere together. And then- he’s gone, so as I was sitting next to Reece Wynans in the studio, where he was absolutely laying it down so beautifully, I stayed to cry. It hit me- I never got to play with Stevie, but here is his keyboard player playing on my album, and he’s set up next to me. When Reece saw me, he said something like Girl, I’m not that good!! I kinda laughed. I didn’t tell him why I was crying,

What would you say characterizes Chicago blues scene in comparison to other US local scenes and circuits?

Chicago is still the Eli center of blues. It’s still dominated by black musicians. And I’m sorry, but they bring the fire, the soul, the sensuality.

What do you miss most nowadays from the blues of the past? What are your hopes and fears for the future of?

Most of the greats are gone, headliners and side people. The level of musicianship is weaker, less inventive. I have no thoughts on the future because of this pandemic. We are living in intense times.

What are some of the most important lessons you have learned from your experience in the music paths?

I have learned that you need enough ego or confidence to play and perform, but ultimately you have to get your ego out of the way and let the music flow out of you as a gift to the listeners abs other musicians you are playing with

What is the impact of blues on the racial, political, human rights, feminist, and socio-cultural implications?

There is a big concern that the blues is whitewashed in a sense….

Interview by Michael Limnios

[embedded content]

Spread the love

  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  • 1
  •  
  •  
  •  
  • 1
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  • 1
  •  

All images & transcripts are of Fair Use and copyright to their respected & collective owners. Some images copyright AP, Clipart.com.

Interview with Erja Lyytinen: The Blues Queen: Video, Photos

Post Views: 9,500

Interview with Finnish blues singer/guitarist Erja Lyytinen: voted #2 on Total Guitar’s “10 World’s Best Guitarists Now” poll.

How has the Blues and Rock Counterculture influenced your views of the world and the journeys you’ve taken?

By being able to travel around the world and meeting lot´s of different people from different cultures I´ve learned so many things and seen so many things that I wouldn´t have seen unless if I was a traveling musician. I have learned, there´s blues lovers everywhere where you go and it seems to be a unique group of people who value music that has been actually played by musicians on stage, with sincere, honest lyrics and with huge emotional output. Also, the fact that musician lifestyle is so different compared to an ordinary day life, changes your way of looking at things. Nothing is ever regular, except that everything is always irregular. Plans are always changing, and things moving forward. There´s no dull moment in this business!

Where does your creative drive come from? What was the hardest part of writing “Blues Queen” book?

I have been always very enthusiastic about music and playing, ever since I was a kid. I can still remember the feeling what I felt when I sang on top of my Father´s guitar playing at the age of four (4). Music moved me, it made me happy, and brought out feelings. So later in life I really wanted to become a professional musician so therefore I soke into various different music schools and learned so much I could from music in overall. Nowadays I run my own record company and play normally hundred shows per year around the world, and I enjoy performing live more than ever! But I also enjoy that time, when I can just create music, and dig deeper to songs. Music is my occupation and a hobby, and I feel very privileged that I can do what I do.

When writing “The Blues Queen”, hardest thing was to get into ugliest feelings, to open up and tell people about the hard times. But then again, it´s good to tell that success doesn´t come without sacrifices. I have recorded several albums, written a book, and we recently also put out Erja Lyytinen Songbooks (VOL1 and VOL2) and nowadays I also have my own tea brand. So, I really like being creative in other ways as well and this also keeps my mind fresh.

Are there any memories from ‘Lockdown Live 2020’ (on line event) which you’d like to share with us?

It sure was very exciting to play with my band after two months of a break in May 2020. We were all so full of energy and joy – not knowing how long this corona situation would last. While recording “Lockdown Live”, this was our first proper stream gig with multiple cameras, so everything, the whole production, the situation, was new for all of us. We were simply just happy to be able to do some work at least! We had a meet & greet session with the fans in the end of the live stream, and it was really lovely to answer to people´s questions. I didn´t see my fans, but I could “feel” them.

What do you miss most nowadays from the music of the past? What are your hopes and fears for the future of?

I miss the interaction between the audience and the band. I love the fact that every gig is different and how audience reacts, really has a huge impact also how you are on stage. Although I always do my best, whether I am performing for 20 people or 20.000 people, and if it´s a private gig, a gig in a jail (yes, done few of these!) or a sitting audience in a concert hall. My hopes are that the vaccine really works for the people and we can get back doing what we really love. My fears are that the music industry will suffer even more if this situation won´t get any better. And the less unfortunate people will suffer even more. We will see the effect of corona after few years in childcare and mental services I am afraid.

I really do hope that we can play and travel freely in 2022. I can´t wait to travel to Australia, where we supposed to play last year. I can only imagine the happiness we all feel, when we can finally meet our fans and friends around the globe, and can hug each other without a fear of getting an ugly virus.

If you could change one thing in the musical world and it would become a reality, what would that be?

I would improve the compensation regarding digital services and using of music and art freely online. The overall feeling nowadays feels like that music should be free for consumers, although just making a one proper music video for Youtube with multiple cameras requires a lot of resources. I do use Youtube and Spotify myself too and my latest albums and some of the stream gigs are there for free for everyone. But then we also have some music videos on Vimeo for a purchase as well.

What does to be a female artist in a Man’s World as James Brown says? What is the status of women in music?

Women´s status in the music business has gotten a lot better nowadays. Majority of the new guitar buyers is females, all the social media channels are full of women and girls playing guitar, bass, drums, all of these instruments, that men used to only play. I think it is fantastic! Music shouldn’t be judged by one´s sex, but by the quality of it.

What are some of the most important lessons you have learned from your experience in the music paths?

Always be kind, try inspiring others, and don´t be afraid to share. Don´t try pleasing others, but just follow your own instincts. And most of all, be true to yourself, in the end we have to only responsible for yourself, and you are the one you have to live with for the rest of your life, with every decision you make.

What is the impact of music on the socio-cultural implications? How do you want it to affect the people?

Music really crosses all the boundaries. Music is a language, that everyone can learn and when you speak the same “language”, you can share emotions. It´s amazing to get to play for example in India, and encouraging young women by saying, that I am a guitarist, and a Mother and entrepreneur and travelling around the world all the time, doing my dream job. That everything in life can be possible.

Let’s take a trip with a time machine, so where and why would you really want to go for a whole day?

I would travel fifty years ahead. Just to have a look how all is then and what kind of future my kids would have. And what kind of music we would listen. I am pretty sure that people will always listen to Led Zeppelin, Hendrix and other “organic” music, and enjoy music performed live, let´s at least hope so!

Interview by Michael Limnios / Photos by Hertta Hynninen & Iiro Laitinen

[embedded content]

Spread the love

  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  • 0
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  • 0
  •  
  •  

All images & transcripts are of Fair Use and copyright to their respected & collective owners. Some images copyright AP, Clipart.com.

Interview with Jeremiah Johnson: Southern Heaven Gate: Video, Photos

Post Views: 9,479

Interview with St. Louis-based Jeremiah Johnson: the voice of Mississippi River blues blending with the struggles of everyday life.

How has the Blues, Rock and Roots music influenced your views of the world and the journeys you’ve taken?

If there is one thing my music journey has taught me, it’s the fact that you can’t judge a book by it’s cover. I have seen people who look conservative completely burn up the dance floor and throw it down. I have also seen big strong biker guys break down in tears when they hear a song that touches their heart. In the end of the day, it seems we all have a big heart for music.

How do you describe your sound, music philosophy and songbook? Where does your creative drive come from?

It can be hard to describe my sound, but it starts out with a 70’s southern rock, blues-based foundation. I have a bit of a Kentucky/Southern accent that comes out occasionally, and I always try to do what is best for the song. A good song is where the magic mojo all begins. There are thousands of amazing guitar players, it’s good songwriting that separates the diamonds from the coal.

It seems like I have been dreaming about playing the guitar and writing songs since my life began. Truthfully, I was 6 years old when I first begged my parents to pay for guitar lessons. It’s been a long road and a lot of years with the same dream.

Which meetings have been the most important experiences? What was the best advice anyone ever gave you?

There have been many moments in my career that I could point to as “important experiences” and it is hard to say that one or the other was more important. I would say I am extremely thankful for the friendship I have had with Mike Zito and Devon Allman. I have known them for decades now and it makes me happy to see both doing so well. They have both been good to me. Zito and Allman have both produced records for me.

The best advice I have is, “Every step forward, no natter how small, is a step in the right direction. It could be a long road ahead, just keep moving forward and you will reach your goals. The true joy of life is in the journey.”

Are there any memories from gigs, jams, open acts and studio sessions which you’d like to share with us?

In 2019, I was fortunate enough of tour with Mike Zito. We had a 12-hr drive across Germany and Zito asked me if I wanted to take a journey or ride in the van. I said let take a journey! We rode in a taxi, two different trains, two different trains and one short plane ride. We arrived at the hotel doorstep in about 10 hours and I had such a wonderful experience traveling across Germany. I hope to be back in Europe in Fall of 2021.

What do you miss most nowadays from the blues of the past? What are your hopes and fears for the future of?

I can’t say I miss anything nowadays; I just wish blues was popular like it was in the 80’ and 90’s. Bands like The Fabulous Thunderbirds, SRV and Eric Clapton used to be on the big radio stations. If we keep going the way we are headed with streaming services and lack of interest in physical CD’s, smaller blues artists are not going to be able to earn a living.

Why do you think that Ruf Records (Label) continues to generate such a devoted following?

Because Thomas Ruf is a genius! Hell, he signed me didn’t he! Seriously, Ruf Records consistently puts out high quality artists who push the envelopes of the genera. I am proud to be on Ruf Records and have a great relationship with everyone at the label.

What would you say characterizes St. Louis Blues scene in comparison to other local US scenes and circuits?

To me St Louis Blues is somewhere between Texas and Chicago styles of blues. Lot’s of horn players, plenty of piano players and a solid band that can not only shuffle, but they can bring the heat. It’s hard to explain. Why don’t you come visit our city and I can show you how good it feels.

What is the impact of music on the socio-cultural implications? How do you want it to affect people?

Blues music brings people of all kinds, together and helps one realize that we are more alike than not. I hope my music makes you want to dance, close your eyes and forget what troubles you.

Let’s take a trip with a time machine, so where and why would you really want to go for a whole day?

I would like to go back to the amazing concerts I went to in my youthful party days and actually pay attention to the damn concert! I went to some great concerts and only seen half of them!

Interview by Michael Limnios

[embedded content]

Spread the love

  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  • 1
  •  
  •  
  •  
  • 1
  • 1
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  • 1
  •  

All images & transcripts are of Fair Use and copyright to their respected & collective owners. Some images copyright AP, Clipart.com.

Interview with Hamilton Loomis: Season Blues Greetings: Video, Photos

Post Views: 9,718

Interview with Texas blues musician Hamilton Loomis: Christmas album “This Season” brings us hope – at a time when it’s needed most.

How has the Blues and Rock Counterculture influenced your views of the world and the journeys you’ve taken?

I can say growing up in the Blues scene really opened my eyes to the power of music to unite people. I was lucky to be mentored by Blues veterans, and they showed me how music shatters the barriers between race, culture, age, gender, etc., and that’s more important than ever to be a part of in our very divided country and world.

How do you describe your sound, music philosophy and songbook? Where does your creative drive come from?

People have said my “sound” is hard to describe…it’s really a mash-up of all my favorite music I listened to growing up: Soul, Blues, Rock, Funk, and Pop. I try to make my sound as homogenous as possible, so it comes out as Funk rhythms with Blues & Rock guitar, Soul-like vocals, and most written with Pop-type melodies. As far as creative drive, I have learned to find inspiration in everyday life, sometimes from everyday things, and turn them into something uplifting or inspirational. A lot of my recent inspiration has come from my 6-year-old son, who was diagnosed with hyperinsulinism, a rare pancreatic disease that causes dangerously low blood sugar. This has also changed my mission to include raising awareness for hyperinsulinism and hypoglycemia.

Are there any memories from gigs, jams, and studio which you’d like to share? What was the best advice anyone ever gave you?

I think my favorite memory was Bo Diddley calling me on stage to jam with him when I was 16…it spawned a friendship with him that lasted until he passed away, and I’m so grateful for it! He gave me a lot of advice and encouragement…the best advice was to find my own sound: “Don’t sound like me, sound like YOU. Innovate, don’t imitate”. That was the beginning of my journey in becoming as artist.

What do you miss most nowadays from the blues of the past? What are your hopes and fears for the future of?

I think I miss the original authenticity, to be honest…the Blues pioneers and Blues masters sang about their lives, and about their truth, which was so pure. I knew early on that even though I had a deep reverence for Blues, and was educated by some notable Blues masters, I didn’t live the life they did, nor could I ever sing about the topics they sang about. I knew I had to find my own truth, and sing about my experiences and from my perspective, while still honoring the music and passing it on to future generations.

If you could change one thing in the musical world and it would become a reality, what would that be?

I wish that talent + vision + originality = automatic success and millions of records sold. I know so many amazing musicians and artists who never make it, and yet there are many untalented and/or unoriginal artists that top the charts. It doesn’t seem fair.

What touched (emotionally) you from the Christmas’ spirit and songs? How does the Seasons affect your mood and inspiration?

I love that Christmas is all about togetherness, family, giving, etc. I feel like Christmas (in general) gives the world a much-needed jolt of positivity. Regarding the seasons, that’s a tough one, because here in South Texas where I live, we have basically one season: HOT. I mean, it occasionally gets cold in Winter, but not for long…it was 78 degrees last Christmas, and I remember 3 or 4 years ago it was 80 degrees! In fact, this very situation inspired me to write one of my Christmas songs, “Another South Texas Christmas” which is totally tongue-in-cheek, but a really fun song to perform live.

What are some of the most important lessons you have learned from your experience in the music paths?

I mentioned this in an earlier question, but music (and especially LIVE music) is truly one of the only things that brings different people together. Over the years, I’ve had many small onstage moments that have made a huge impact in my life: watching black & white people synchronously bobbing their heads at a concert, watching an old guy fist-bump a young guy at a live show, watching poor folks jammin’ out next to rich folks…these may seem like small things, but they showed me the power of music, and made me sure that I was doing something meaningful in the world.

What is the impact of Blues on the socio-cultural implications? How do you want it to affect people?

First of all, I think that it’s important that people realize and understand the struggles and hardships Black Americans were going through when this music was first created, and how it literally influenced all American music to follow. Also, it’s important for musicians of my generation to educate the younger generations on this topic, and how important Blues is for our history. Now, even though times have changed, and the music has evolved and changed, I believe that at its core, Blues is about expression, and everybody has something to say or express… and when artists put their music out there into the world, they connect with people who feel the same things.

Let’s take a trip with a time machine, so where and why would you really want to go for a whole day?

That’s a tough one! I think I would love to experience a day at Woodstock 1969… I think that festival was an amazing historical event for music, not just because there were so many amazing artists that performed there, but because of the peaceful gathering. That year produced some of my favorite music of all time. Let’s just pick a day that it didn’t rain!

Interview by Michael Limnios

[embedded content]

Spread the love

  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  • 1
  •  
  •  
  •  
  • 1
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  • 1
  •  

All images & transcripts are of Fair Use and copyright to their respected & collective owners. Some images copyright AP, Clipart.com.

Interview with Jack de Keyzer: Tribute to the masters: Video, Photos

Post Views: 9,852

Interview with Canadian guitarist Jack de Keyzer, pays tribute to the great blues masters and heroes

How has the Blues and Rock Counterculture influenced your views of the world and the journeys you’ve taken?

I grew up in the era of hippies and psychedelia and very liberal views and I haven’t really changed through the years. I’m peace and love guy.

How do you describe your sound, music philosophy and songbook? Where does your creative drive come from?

My sound is very blues oriented with strong elements of British blues rock. I grew up with the Beatles the Rolling Stones and a few later years later, when I’d been playing the guitar for a couple of years I was heavily influenced by Clapton, Cream, Jimi Hendrix and a few years after that Led Zeppelin. A few years after that I became very influenced by the original blues people starting with Robert Johnson, and a lot of the Chess records Chicago Blues masters. I am also very influenced by soul jazz, hard bop and a lot of the Blue Note jazz musicians.

Which meetings have been the most important experiences? What was the best advice anyone ever gave you?

My first big mentor was a guy from Canada named King Biscuit Boy aka Richard Newell. He had one of the largest blues record collections in Canada and was an internationally acclaimed recording artist singer, songwriter and harmonica player. He turned me onto all the great bluesman, on Chess records, Specialty records, Excello, King, Sun, just to name a few. It was a great education and my first big time pro gig.

Are there any memories from gigs, jams, open acts and studio sessions which you’d like to share with us?

I played a series of shows with Bo Diddley in the 90s. We were rehearsing at the El Mocambo night club in Toronto getting ready for our first of two nights. He looked at the drummer and said do you know the Bo Diddley beat? The drummer nodded yeah man of course! Bo looked at him and said, ‘don’t play it.’ Because- Bo Diddley played that beat on his guitar! Nobody else was supposed to play that. We all had to play counterpoint rhythms to what he was playing. I Also played for a week with the incredible Etta James. She called me “the Canadian Keith Richards”, I also got lots of great advice from classic Blues people like Muddy Waters drummer, the late great Willie “Big Eyes” Smith. Whenever I got too fancy, too high up the neck, or too fast, he’d look at me and say “Take your time son- play the blues” These guys they only played with feeling -if you can’t play with feeling -you may as well not play at all! And that’s my little bit of advice.

What do you miss most nowadays from the blues of the past? What are your hopes and fears for the future of?

I miss authenticity, I miss blues with a feeling. There’s way too much importance put on how many guitars you have on stage, and what vintage they are, and how fast you can play and which fancy venue in which country you toured. It’s just faking it- there’s no real feeling there. Rich people playing and buying their way into the blues – I can’t go for that! No can do.

Make an account of the case of the blues in Canada. Which is the most interesting period in local blues scene?

The blues scene in Canada is the strongest it’s ever been right now. There are so many great artists. Classic artists like Colin James. Sue Foley is a very good player and singer, my friends in Monkey Junk, Paul DesLauriers Band, Steve Strongman, Dawn Tyler Watson are all world-class. And also, young up-and-coming guys like Spencer MacKenzie are making great records.

What are some of the most important lessons you have learned from your experience in music paths?

What I love about music is that the possibilities are limitless. I consider myself a lifelong student of music and love every day that I get to play, practice and compose. Music is a never-ending fountain of inspiration.

What is the impact of music on the socio-cultural implications? How do you want it to affect people?

Nietzsche said it best, “Life without music would be a mistake”. And here’s my quote “Music is the glue that binds us together.”

Let’s take a trip with a time machine, so where and why would you really want to go for a whole day?

Jimi Hendrix Experience debut at the Bag o’ Nails club in London England November 25, 1966. Every British blues rocker was at that gig, the Rolling Stones, Clapton, Jeff Beck, Pete Townsend, Jimmy Page, John Mayall. That’s one date I would’ve liked to have been in attendance!

Interview by Michael Limnios / Photos by David McDonald

[embedded content]

Spread the love

  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  • 2
  •  
  •  
  •  
  • 1
  • 1
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  • 2
  •  

All images & transcripts are of Fair Use and copyright to their respected & collective owners. Some images copyright AP, Clipart.com.

Interview with Joseph Mojo Morganfield: I think Blues can be a happy song as well: Video, Photos

Post Views: 9,827

Interview with blues singer Joseph “Mojo” Morganfield – Muddy Waters‘ youngest son is a rising star on the Chicago blues scene.

How has the Blues music influenced your views of the world and the journeys you’ve taken?

Having Blues at an early age, seeing my father’s trials and tribulations, seeing current events happening in the world…the Blues has made me stronger, with a thick skin, I have learned to hope for the best but prepare for the worst.

How do you describe your music philosophy and songbook? What was the hardest part to be Muddy’s son?

My music is definitely influenced by my father, with a more up to date approach. I don’t necessarily like “old fashioned” Blues – I think Blues can be a happy song as well.

The high expectations of being Muddy’s son – people compare me to Muddy. They need to realize there is only one Muddy Waters. I am trying to make a way for Mojo Morganfield.

Which meetings have been the most important experiences? What was the best advice anyone ever gave you?

Bob Margolin – knowing him as a kid and performing with him as an adult – we have an unbreakable bond.
Best advise was from my father – he taught me to be true to myself – to be me – people are going to like you or they’re not but you have to be true to yourself.

What do you miss most nowadays from the blues of the past? What are your hopes and fears for the future of?

I miss the stories and comraderies – when a musician was a musician and didn’t have to be in your band to perform on stage. I miss traveling with my band – now there are bands waiting for you. My dad would have never gone for that. His band went everywhere with him.

That the Blues will continue – we need to reach out to youth, to continue to find and encouraged young talent.

Why do you think that Delmark Records continues to generate such a devoted following?

It is the oldest American Jazz/Blues record label, and its right here in Chicago. With that recognition they can reach a lot of people. That is why I chose Delmark to release my new single “It’s Good to be King”.

What would you say characterizes Chicago blues scene in comparison to other US local scenes and circuits?

Chicago Blues is the capital of Blues – founded in Mississippi, but different in St Louis and Tennessee, made more of an urban sound in Chicago. My dad changed the dynamics – Chicago doesn’t use horns, we use a harp instead. Two guitars, a rhythm and a lead, we added a piano. That’s the Chicago way.

What are some of the most important lessons you have learned from your experience in the music paths?

Always have a rehearsal with a new band. Encourage others – especially younger – you never know who is the next Buddy Guy, Muddy Waters, or Howling Wolf. Stay humble.

What is the impact of Blues on the racial and socio-cultural implications? How do you want it to affect people?

The Blues changed. When my father was a young man the blues was a black audience, but when Eric Clapton, the Rolling Stones, and Johnny Winters introduced the world to my father the Blues became white overnight. But the Blues is the foundation of music and crosses cultural borders – no boundaries – meaning age or race.

Let’s take a trip with a time machine, so where and why would you really want to go for a whole day?

1941 – Clarksdale MS to the day Alan Lomax recorded a young Muddy Waters for the Library of Congress. I also want to find Robert Johnson to see how great he was.

Interview By Michael Limnios / Photos by Connie Carroll

[embedded content]

Rehearsal 🎤🎵🎤🎵🎤🎵🎤🎵 - Joseph Mojo Morganfield | Facebook

Rehearsal 🎤🎵🎤🎵🎤🎵🎤🎵 - Joseph Mojo Morganfield | Facebook

Spread the love

  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  • 2
  •  
  •  
  •  
  • 1
  • 1
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  • 2
  •  

All images & transcripts are of Fair Use and copyright to their respected & collective owners. Some images copyright AP, Clipart.com.