See Photos of Dave Grohl Through the Years

Dave Grohl is like the cool rock ‘n’ roll uncle everyone wishes they had. Whether he’s pounding away on the drums or wailing away behind the mic, he’s always got a smile on his face and making people feel at home.

Grohl was born in Ohio on Jan. 14, 1969. As per the Record, he went to see his very first live show at the age of 13 — a punk band called Naked Raygun, and from that point on he was a huge punk fan. He learned the guitar and the drums, and joined the band Scream as their drummer when he was 17.

While in Scream, Grohl became acquainted with the Melvins, particularly frontman Buzz Osborne. When Osborne’s friends in Nirvana, Kurt Cobain and Krist Novoselic, were looking for a drummer, he connected them with Grohl. The rest was history.

Following the death of Cobain in 1994, Grohl recorded a 15-track demo where he performed all of the instrumentation himself, as noted in the New York Times. That demo later became the Foo Fighters‘ self-titled debut album.

Grohl recruited several other rockers to join him for the project, and has been the frontman and guitarist of the Foo Fighters ever since. He’s the drummer and voice behind some of the greatest rock songs we know today, and is just a damn legend overall.

Scroll through the gallery below to see photos of Grohl through the years.

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Foo Fighters’ New Single ‘Waiting on a War’ Ponders a Dark Future

Foo Fighters have released the third single from their upcoming album Medicine at Midnight. You can hear “Waiting on a War” below.

Described in a news release as a “sprawling melodic opus,” “Waiting on a War” was inspired by a conversation frontman Dave Grohl had with his child.

“Last fall, as I was driving my daughter to school, she turned to me and asked, ‘Daddy, is there going to be a war?'” Grohl recalled. “My heart sank as I realized that she was now living under the same dark cloud that I had felt 40 years ago. I wrote ‘Waiting on a War’ that day.”

The song concludes more hopefully, the news release adds, with “a patented Foo Fighters rave-up.”

“Is there more to this than just waiting on a war?” Grohl asked rhetorically. “Because I need more. We all do. This song was written for my daughter Harper, who deserves a future, just as every child does.”

They’ll perform the new single tonight on Jimmy Kimmel Live!, as Grohl celebrates his birthday. The nine-song Medicine at Midnight is due on Feb. 5 and was co-produced by Greg Kurstin and Foo Fighters.

The album’s two previous advance tracks were “Shame Shame” and “No Son of Mine.” Grohl is joined by Taylor Hawkins, Nate Mendel, Chris Shiflett, Pat Smear and Rami Jaffee in the band’s current lineup.

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Foo Fighters Vans Shoes + Japanese Sake Beverage Both Coming Soon

Not only is there a new Foo Fighters album arriving next month, but Foo Fighters-branded Vans shoes and a custom Japanese sake from the Dave Grohl-led rockers will be available around the same time.

Indeed, a pair of sharp-looking Vans Sk8-Hi kicks emblazoned with the Foos’ unmistakable “FF” logo and two varieties of band-tasted and approved Tatenokawa sake, a brand of the rice wine that originates from Japan, will accompany Foo Fighters’ Medicine at Midnight.

While no exact drop date has emerged for the Foo Fighters Vans, the skateboarding shoe and apparel maker shared a preview of the sneakers this week (Jan. 12). “In celebration of their 25th Anniversary,” the company said, “we collaborated with [Foo Fighters] on a special limited edition pair of Vans. The Vans x Foo Fighters Sk8-Hi is coming soon.”

The sake will be available from Feb. 5, the same day Medicine at Midnight comes out. The “Hansho (Midnight)” alcoholic drink, available in both blue and silver versions of the Junmai Daiginjo sake, is said by Tatenokawa to be based on Foo Fighters members’ personal favorite sake flavors.

As if that weren’t enough to get Foo fans stoked for all that lies ahead, there’s another new Foo Fighters song coming out on Thursday (Jan. 14). It’s called “Waiting on a War,” and the group recently shared a preview of the acoustic-driven number alongside a brief primer from Grohl.

“As a child growing up in the suburbs of Washington DC, I was always afraid of war,” Grohl said of the tune, the third single from Medicine at Midnight. “I had nightmares of missiles in the sky and soldiers in my backyard, most likely brought upon by the political tension of the early 1980’s and my proximity to the Nation’s Capitol. My youth was spent under the dark cloud of a hopeless future.”

“Waiting on a War” follows Medicine at Midnight‘s opening single, “Shame Shame,” as well as a follow-up, “No Son of Mine.” The upcoming LP is the Foos’ first since 2017’s Concrete and Gold.

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Axl Rose Sent Dave Grohl a Guitar to Thank Him for ‘Throne’ Use

Dave Grohl was onto something when he had a throne created to help the singer tour after breaking his leg. That throne paid huge benefits including a very special gift that the Foo Fighters leader treasures that was sent to him by Axl Rose after Rose borrowed the throne after suffering a foot injury.

Fans may remember that Grohl’s performance throne ended up being a part of the early days of GN’R‘s “Not in This Lifetime” tour after Rose injured his foot at the opening show of the trek at the Troubadour. It also followed Rose when he joined AC/DC to help them continue their “Rock or Bust” tour.

Reflecting on how that came to be, Grohl told Classic Rock magazine that it was Duff McKagan who initially reached out on Rose’s behalf. “Axl took it out with Guns N’ Roses, then he took it out with AC/DC, and then all of a sudden I became the guy you come to if you break a limb on tour, like Thrones R Us,’ Grohl recalls.

The gesture was definitely acknowledged by Rose as Grohl reveals in the chat that a rather stellar guitar was sent to him as a thank you. “He had Slash go pick me a guitar,” Grohl reveals. “And he picked me an early-’60s Gibson ES 335 Dot, which to this day is the nicest fucking guitar I have ever played in my life,” says Grohl. “It was an incredibly kind and classy gesture, and I was very appreciative.”

Rose wasn’t the only beneficiary of Grohl’s throne as the Foo Fighters leader also lent it to Matthew Ramsey of the country outfit Old Dominion for a period in 2019. Ramsey stated at the time, “I’m sure Dave didn’t know that when he created this thing, everyone would want to use it. But, it has been an honor to sit on, and more importantly, it’s allowing us to keep the show on the road. Our fans are truly grateful. We owe him big for that.”

The throne was also prominently featured as a photo opportunity piece at Foo Fighters’ Cal Jam concerts in California during their successive years of operation, so Grohl has gotten quite a bit of mileage out of the creation.

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Hear Foo Fighters’ New Song ‘No Son of Mine’ From Upcoming LP

Foo Fighters rang in 2021 by releasing “No Son of Mine,” a new song from their recently announced 10th LP, Medicine at Midnight.

“No Son of Mine” follows the album’s first single, “Shame Shame,” which they debuted on a December episode of Saturday Night Live. In a recent interview, guitarist Chris Shiflett described that song as “definitely a little different than anything we’ve ever done before” and a “little bit different than anything else on the record.” He noted that the nine-song record, which follows 2017’s Concrete and Gold, has a lot of “groove-based” material as a result of band leader Dave Grohl‘s perspective. “Dave’s a drummer,” he told The Brag, “so he’s always coming up with rhythmic twists and riffs based on rhythms that he hears in his head.”

The new song appears to support his case. While Grohl’s trademark vocal delivery is present and correct, the song is driven by a dominant country rock and even rockabilly feel, with a contrasting ’70s-style high-pitched backing vocals. The lyrics seem to address hypocrisy or confusion related to the space between forgiveness and denial, as Grohl describes “living dead” who have a “hand to God with one foot in the grave” in an “age of lost innocence.” The accompanying looped animation seems to illustrate a corrupt circle of life that involves tumbling through an existence of distraction, with greed becoming the dominant influence.

Medicine at Midnight is out Feb. 5 via RCA / Roswell. Grohl announced that Foo Fighters had finished recording the album in March, calling it “unlike anything we’ve ever done.”

“I’m so fucking proud of it,” he said. “I’m fucking excited for people to hear it and I can’t wait to jump on that fucking stage to play it. […] There are choruses on this record that 50-fucking-thousand people are gonna sing, and it’s gonna bring everyone’s fucking hearts together in that moment. And that’s what it’s all about.”

Foo Fighters – ‘No Son of Mine’

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Foo Fighters Kick Off 2021 With New Song ‘No Son of Mine’

Happy Foo Year! 2021 is just a few minutes old, but we’ve already got fresh music from the Foo Fighters. The band just dropped the second song from their forthcoming Medicine at Midnight album, titled “No Son of Mine.”

The track is a definite rocker with a ghostly backing choral and a propulsive drumbeat. Have a listen to the song in full in the player at the bottom of this post and see the lyrics right here:

No son of mine will ever do
The work of villains, the will of fools
If you believe it
It must be true
No son of mine
No son of mine

No son of mine will ever need to beg forgiveness
No wicked deed
Head full of evil, heart full of greed
No son of mine
No son of mine

Here we are
Living dead
Hand to God with one foot in the grave
Age of lost innocence
Don’t forget what your good book says
No son of mine

No son of mine will ever be
Under the power vested in thee
March into slaughter down on his knees
No son of mine
No son of mine

Here we are
Living dead
Hand to God with one foot in the grave
Age of lost innocence
Don’t forget what your good book says
No son of mine

No son of mine will ever say
Words of illusion, oh this I pray
Heretofore taking my name in vain
No son of mine
No son of mine

Here we are
Living dead
Hand to God with one foot in the grave
Age of lost innocence
Don’t forget what your good book says
No son of mine

“No Son of Mine” follows on the heels of “Shame Shame,” which arrived back in early November. As for their new album, Dave Grohl revealed that the band has attempted to shake things up a bit musically.

He stated back in May, “It’s filled with anthemic, huge, sing-along rock songs. It’s weird because it’s almost like a dance record — not like an EDM, disco, modern dance record. It’s got groove, man. To me, it’s like our David Bowie’s Let’s Dance record.”

Medicine at Midnight will arrive on Feb. 5. You can currently pre-save / pre-order the album at this location.

Foo Fighters, “No Son of Mine”

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New Foo Fighters Song Kinda Sounds Similar to Rammstein

Foo Fighters have another fresh song en route tonight, but the teaser for the track definitely gives us the feel of another Loudwire favorite act, Rammstein.

A new 14-second animated teaser clip starts off fresh enough with Dave Grohl singing the titular phrase “No Son of Mine,” but it’s soon followed by a driving drumbeat reminiscent of Rammstein’s 1997 world breakout hit “Du Hast” from of their Sehnsucht album. Have a listen below.

Rammstein, “Du Hast”

The newly posted teaser clip also features a ghostly choral vocal accentuating the beat that pays off a bit of previously teased choral vocal the band had posted.

What will the song sound like when you hear it in full? Was the Rammstein nod intentional? We’ll find out more this evening when the track is released. Either way it sounds like we’ve got another Foo Fighters hit on our hands to kick off 2021!

“No Son of Mine” will be the second song to come from the upcoming Medicine at Midnight album, following on the heels of “Shame Shame.” The album is due Feb. 5 and you can pre-order/pre-save the set right here.

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Dave Grohl Thanks Save Our Stages Act Supporters

The past year has been rough on the touring industry, but as the year comes to a close there is some hope for independent music venues across the country with the the passage of the Save Our Stages Act that will provide financial aid to venues during the current shutdown. Getting to this point was no easy task, and Foo Fighters frontman Dave Grohl is voicing his heartfelt thanks to those who helped convince politicians this act needed to be taken.

Shortly after the pandemic started, many of the independent music venues across the country saw the pending financial crisis that would come with an extended shutdown and banded together to form the National Independent Venue Association (NIVA). Together, they rallied music lovers to write their state politicians seeking assistance as it became apparent that “large gathering events” such as concerts would be among the last to return and the extended down period could see the permanent shuttering of many venues without financial aid.

NIVA put on the #SaveOurStages virtual festival this fall to give their cause even more of a spotlight with Grohl’s band Foo Fighters serving as one of the headliners playing a set from the Troubadour in Los Angeles. Grohl has played several virtual benefits during the pandemic to help out live music supporting organizations and the singer was truly grateful to see the Save Our Stages Act pass.

His personal “thank you” can be read below:

A huge, heartfelt thank you to everyone who supported the Save Our Stages Act, which passed yesterday as part of the economic stimulus bill. The preservation of America’s smaller, independent venues is not only crucial to the millions of concert goers whose lives are bettered by experiencing their favorite artists in the flesh, but to the future of music itself, as it gives the next generation of young musicians a place to cut their teeth, hone their craft, and grow into the voices of tomorrow.

The absence of live music this year has left us all longing for that communal feeling of connection, one that is best felt when joined in a song. The Save Our Stages Act brings us one step closer to sharing that feeling again, one that I hope we can all experience again very soon.

Everyday we’re one step closer.

See you there,

Dave

On Dec. 20, it was announced that Congress had finally struck a deal for a second Covid-19 relief package. In that package, $15 billion had been set aside to help live venues, independent movie theaters and cultural institutions.

According to the NIVA website, more than 2.1 million emails were sent to elected officials expressing their support for the Save Our Stages Act. All 535 Congresspeople heard from their constituents through SaveOurStages.com. The site has also generated a “thank you” letter than may now be sent to your Senators and Representatives for their support if you wish to do so. You can find that option here.

Given that it may take some time for the stimulus distribution to venues, NIVA still has the option to donate to their NIVA Emergency Relief Fund. You can do so here.

Foo Fighters completed their new album early in 2020, but like many acts they initially decided to hold it until they could tour. As Grohl recently explained, they eventually decided it was of greater use for them to put out their album even with the pandemic still continuing.

“Six or seven months went by, and I’m, like, we make this music for people to hear. We don’t just make it so that we can go hit the road. We write these songs so people can enjoy them and sing along, whether it’s in their kitchen by themselves with a bottle of Crown Royal or in a stadium bouncing around, singing the choruses,” stated Grohl to New York’s Q104.3.

He concluded, “I was, like, right now, more than ever, people need something to lift their spirits, something to give them some feeling of relief or escape. I was, like, ‘We’ve gotta put it out. Let’s put it out right now.’ I don’t know when we’re gonna hit the road, but we need to give the music to the people, ’cause that’s why we make it.”

Foo Fighters’ Medicine at Midnight is due Feb. 5 and pre-orders are currently available here (As Amazon affiliates, we earn on qualifying purchases).

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Dave Grohl’s Teenage Christmas on Mushrooms

Dave Grohl recalled how he had taken mushrooms during a Christmas party held by his mom for their family and her teacher colleagues, and then spent the night failing to learn a Led Zeppelin song.

The Foo Fighters frontman said he shouldn’t be telling the old story as he related his teenage adventure to Apple Music’s Zane Lowe. He want on explain that if his band ever released a Christmas single, it would signal the end of the group.

“I grew up in a house that was really small, and every Christmas night, people just knew to come over to the Grohls’ little house,” he said. “We would all just sit around and listen to music and drink and stuff like that. By the time I was like 14 or 15, now I’m in a punk-rock band, my punk-rock friends are coming over. Then my mom’s teacher friends are coming over and then my sister.”

He remembered “this one year, I think I was like 15 or something like that … my friend gave me mushrooms for Christmas, right? I’d never taken them before. So I thought, ‘Okay, I probably shouldn’t take them at this party because all of my mother’s friends are coming over.’ … They’re teachers at the school that I go to.”

He ignored his own instincts and took “a little” sample of the mushrooms before the party. “I was out of my fucking mind,” he admitted. “So much so, one of the teachers from the school pulled me into the bathroom at one point and was like, ‘Are you doing cocaine?’ I was like, ‘No, no!’ So then after everyone left, I stayed up and tried to learn that Zeppelin song, ‘Bron-Yr-Aur,’ that acoustic thing, until like six o’clock in the morning. I never figured it out. I thought I figured it out, but I didn’t really figure it out.”

Grohl recently marked the holiday season by releasing a series of cover versions for Hanukkah and a version of “Run Rudolph Run,” but when he was asked if the Foo Fighters would ever write their own Christmas song, he rejected the idea.

“It’s kind of tricky,” he replied. “You’re so used to the classics. … We’ve been asked to do it, but I wouldn’t even know what to say. … No, we’ve never even tried. I don’t know if people would want us to do that. I’m not sure. Maybe the day that we decide we don’t want to do this anymore, we make a Christmas song and then we ride off into the sunset.”

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Is New Foo Fighters Album Called ‘Medicine at Midnight’?

Fans are speculating that the title of the Foo Fighters‘ 10th album will be Medicine at Midnight, as Dave Grohl’s band continued a program of teasers.

They posted a 32-second audio clip featuring a drum beat to Twitter after an appearance for this weekend on Saturday Night Live was announced. The Shazam app apparently confirms that the track is “Shame Shame” from a Foo Fighters album titled Medicine at Midnight, according to Uproxx.

The text “FF X” – possibly referring to the Foo Fighters’ 10th album – has been seen on a building in Los Angeles, and a projection in Sherman Oaks displayed the logo followed by a burning coffin. Flames were also featured in the image that accompanied the audio clip. The coffin appears when the songs “The Pretender” and “These Days” are played on Spotify.

Fans already knew that the follow-up to 2017’s Concrete and Gold was complete.

“It’s filled with anthemic, huge, sing-along rock songs. It’s kind of like a dance record, but not an EDM, disco, modern dance record. It’s got groove,” Grohl confirmed to NME in May. “To me, it’s our David Bowie’s Let’s Dance record. That’s what we wanted to make: We wanted to make this really up, fun record.”

Grohl previously described the work as “unlike anything we’ve ever done,” saying “there are choruses on this record that 50-fucking-thousand people are gonna sing, and it’s gonna bring everyone’s fucking hearts together in that moment. And that’s what it’s all about.”

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Foo Fighters + Dave Chappelle to Perform on ‘Saturday Night Live’

Dave Chappelle and Foo Fighters will attempt to heal the nation this Saturday (Nov. 7) on the first post-election episode of Saturday Night Live.

After Donald Trump was elected in 2016, Chappelle famously told viewers to give Trump a chance as long as he gave historically disenfranchised folks one. The legendary comic went on to parody The Walking Dead and the 2016 election itself, while A Tribe Called Quest scored the night with music from their landmark 2016 album, We Got It From Here… Thank You 4 Your Service.

The Chappelle’s Show star will return to SNL this Saturday, hopefully delivering another campfire monologue to quell the fierce divisions of a very close and heavily contested election.

As for the Foo Fighters, they tweeted SNL’s new teaser video, adding “See you this weekend Chappelle!”

The stadium rock band most recently performed on SNL in December 2017, jamming “The Sky Is a Neighborhood” and a medley of “Everlong,” “Christmas (Baby Please Come Home)” and “Linus and Lucy.”

Fans can catch Dave Chappelle and Foo Fighters on Saturday Night Live this weekend on NBC.

Where Are These Iconic Album Art Cover Models Now?

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Are the Foo Fighters Teasing the Release of a New Album?

Hints that the 10th Foo Fighters album may be on the way have been popping up in Southern California over the past few days.

An Instagram user uploaded a selfie taken in front of the Vogue Theatre on Hollywood Blvd. in Los Angeles, where the band’s logo and an X – the Roman numeral for 10 – are on display.

On the Foo Fighters’ Reddit page, someone posted a video of a projection in Sherman Oaks, Calif., where the band’s logo was followed by a burning coffin. Another noted that the same flaming casket showed up while streaming “The Pretender” on Spotify.

Back in March, band leader Dave Grohl revealed that the follow-up to 2017’s Concrete and Gold had been completed. “We just finished another fucking record,” he said. “And I’m so fucking proud of it. It’s unlike anything we’ve ever done. I’m fucking excited for people to hear it, and I can’t wait to jump on that fucking stage to play it.”

He added that “there are choruses on this record that 50-fucking-thousand people are gonna sing, and it’s gonna bring everyone’s fucking hearts together in that moment. And that’s what it’s all about.”

The group had planned to celebrate its 25th anniversary by playing some of the same cities it first hit in 1995, hinting at the possibility of surprise small-club shows. The tour, scheduled to run between April and May, was postponed due to the coronavirus pandemic before being canceled altogether.

“Remember me? The guy who wouldn’t even postpone a show when my goddamn leg was falling off?” Grohl tweeted. “Well, playing a gig with a sock full of broken bones is one thing, but playing a show when your health and safety is in jeopardy is another.”

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