Music News

  • HD Radio Network
    Post Views: 8,728 Lucky Peterson, a keyboardist, guitarist and singer whose blues career kicked off with a novelty hit at age 5, eventually sprawling over dozens of albums and thousands of high-octane gigs, died in Dallas, Tx. on May 17. He was 55. His death
  • HD Radio Network
    Post Views: 9,859 Interview with multiple Blues Music Award winner Doug MacLeod – superb songwriting, guitar wizardry, warm soulful vocals. How has the Blues and Roots Counterculture influenced your views of the world and the journeys you’ve taken? Well, the blues has taught me so
  • HD Radio Network
    Post Views: 10,004 Interview with Mexican versatile saxophonist Evelyn Rubio: Crossing Blues & Soul Borders. How has the Blues, Soul and Rock counterculture influenced your views of the world and the journeys you’ve taken? Well in my native Mexico, Blues and soul are really in
  • HD Radio Network
    Post Views: 10,220 Interview with Jim Gustin and Truth Jones, firmly establish themselves in the southern California blues scene and share some of the wisdom they have gained on the journey. How has the Blues and Rock Counterculture influenced your views of the world and the journeys you’ve taken? Jim: I think that art and artists reflect the culture. I’m not sure how much the blues culture has affected me, other than after the IBCs, where it is clear what a small community it is, and that it really is a sort of family. I am so glad to be part of it. Truth: Blues and Rock music has opened doors into many different environments and ideas that I may not have been able to explore otherwise. It has helped me to see beyond my own circumstances and environment. I think it has helped me understand the world and people in an unfiltered light. How do you describe band’s sound, music philosophy and songbook? Where does your creative drive come from? Jim: We have a big band, 6 people with varying influences, each member adds their unique ingredient to the collective soup that is our music. We try to write songs that tell a story, that are fun and that reflect us as people. Truth: The band’s sound is predominantly blues, but includes influences from rock, soul, and gospel. Before we were a blues band, we performed as a classic rock band, and Jim and I both sang together in church. We both are song writers and we grew tired of playing other artists music. The blues allowed us to tell our own stories. The music we put on albums now comes from the heart and soul of who we are. Are there any memories from gigs, jams, open acts and studio sessions which you’d like to share with us? Jim: We opened for Three Dog Night for three shows at three different venues around LA. These people had never heard of us. We were not even listed on the bill. We played our set, and the people loved us! It was so incredibly encouraging and gave us some
  • HD Radio Network
    Post Views: 10,291 Interview with Victor Wainwright: music representing virtually every corner of the roots music world – new album MEMPHIS LOUD, will be released on APRIL 24. How has the American Roots Music (and Counterculture of) influenced your views of the world and the journeys you’ve taken? American Roots Music and it’s subculture has provided me with opportunities to meet some of the finest examples of human beings this world has to offer. It’s also opened my eyes to both simple and complex everyday realities, that then often become masterfully written stories and songs, delivered both by my colleagues and outstanding songwriters across the globe. How do you describe your sound, music philosophy and songbook? Where does your creative drive come from? I like to produce and write with immense musical curiosity, leaving no roots stone unturned, all the while pushing the art-form forward. I carry with me the lessons from my grandfather, who taught me piano, and countless hours studying the roots of blues, genuine rock ‘n’ roll, jazz, boogie-woogie and honky-tonk, all the while honestly developing that into something modern, fun, unique, emotional and powerful. I draw my inspiration from the musicians, friends, family and fans that surround me. We love each other, and that makes its way into the music. Which meetings have been the most important experiences for you? What was the best advice anyone ever gave you? BB King gave me a lot of great advice. We opened for him for the first time in Daytona Beach, FL at the Peabody theater in front of a sold out crowd of 2500. I was both young and nervous. BB told me something that night that perfectly echoed advice my Grandfather and Father also gave me, which was to play with people you enjoyed playing with. Find friends that you can get a long with, that you love, and then grow musically closer, and explore the music together. Are there any memories from “Memphis Loud” album’s studio sessions which you’d like to share with us? My favorite memories from the recording session involve the days we had the biggest groups of musicians.  Sometimes we had upwards near 10 my closest friends and musicians in the studio all playing together, with the same goal.  We were in those moments, the ultimate team. That was magical, and something these days I think is rarely captured on record. We played and recorded much of Memphis Loud LIVE, and with this many musicians, it was really something special to remember. What do you miss most nowadays from the music of the past? What are your hopes and fears for the future of? You know, at 39 years old I don’t have the privilege to view music in the same way as many of my colleagues. Regrettably, I didn’t experience music of the past in the same way. I reverently respect it. However, my hopes and fears for the future are laid out within the tracks of our album. When I sing about “America,” it’s about the fear and current realities of divisiveness, and how we all must come together in order to heal and grow as a nation. I don’t write with fear in my heart, and I hope that the music we write is proof that music today can be just as strong and beautify powerful as music from any era. My hopes and dreams are that more songwriters and bands in American Roots music are given the opportunity to follow suit, break out of boxes, and write from their heart. That’s what original music is. What are some of the most important lessons you have learned from your experience in music paths? Being comfortable is good. Being complacent is not. What is the impact of music on the socio-cultural implications? How do you want it to affect people? The common traditions, habits and beliefs present within the worldwide audience we play to are strong and humbly deserve recognition. I like to bring people together with our music, and I like to let music heal. The musical language and exchange that naturally happens with our audience is important, but even more so, the emotion that is attached with the messages we deliver are real and delivered with soul, and that exchange comes back to us ten fold. We want the message and the music to continue to effect people deeply, as it already has! Let’s take a trip with a time machine, so where and why would you really want to go for a whole day? There was a very special time in my life and career when my grandfather, father and uncle were all able to play on stage with me. Those are some of the most vivid and beautiful memories of my life. Although I’m certain my Grandfather is now jamming in heaven with the greatest of all time, I’d give anything to be able to time travel, and go back and experience those precious moments again.
  • HD Radio Network
    Post Views: 11,345 Interview with powerhouse vocalist Hurricane Ruth: new album “GOOD LIFE” will be released on APRIL 17, deeply rooted in traditional blues, but make no mistake, she can rock the house. How has the Blues, Country and Rock Counterculture influenced your views of the world and the journeys you’ve taken? They’ve been the soundtrack to my life. They’ve had a profound impact on who I am. I’ve always been a rebel. How do you describe Hurricane Ruth sound, music philosophy and songbook? Where does your creative drive come from? The music I write and perform is a combination of the music I grew up listening to: blues, honky tonk, outlaw, rock, soul/funk, jazz, Dixieland, and big band. I cut my musical teeth on all of these genres. Each one impacted me both creatively, as a songwriter, and stylistically, as a performer. I prefer to crossover many musical boundaries. My creative drive comes from stories/comments from family, friends, and society. It also comes from rhythms and melodies that I hear. Something will resonate with me or sparks in my mind and I have to immediately write it down or sing it into my phone. Are there any memories from “Good Life” studio sessions which you’d like to share? What touched (emotionally) you? Recording the song, Good Life, was very difficult for me. The song is based on a conversation I had with my mother about a year before she passed away. I asked her many deep and pointed questions about her life, what she would have done differently, and if she feared her “judgment day”. During the first pass of recording my vocals, I started thinking about my mom and her passing. I was overcome with emotion. Needless to say, I had to take a break and regroup emotionally before I continued recording my vocal. Which acquaintances have been the most important experiences? What was the best advice anyone ever gave you? I’ve been very blessed to have met some incredible people at my shows. They have become my friends. I’ve received great advice from many different sources. There are a couple of gems that stay with me. My mom told me to, “Fight for your dreams and do what you love.” My dad, who was a fantastic drummer and musician, told me, “Every time you step on a stage, give it your absolute best. Never take it for granted.” Willie Dixon told me, “Hurricane Ruth! That name fits you. Never get rid of it. It’ll serve you well.” What do you miss most nowadays from the blues of past? What are your hopes and fears for the future of? I miss the rawness and simplicity of the blues of the past. No trendy labels or boxes(blues rock, country blues, soul blues, gospel blues, etc.) to try and explain what it was. It was simply, the blues. My hope is that it will continue to evolve and grow. What does to be a female artist in a “Man’s World” as James Brown says? What is the status of women in Blues? It is the 21st century, right? It’s unfortunate that we still have to discuss this subject, and yet; here we are. Yes, women still have to elbow their way in for a seat at the music table. Yes, women still hear this comment from festival talent buyers, “Thanks for your interest, but I already have my one female act. I’ll keep you in mind for next year.” Yes, women’s music still is played less frequently on radio stations. Yes, there are still fewer female talent buyers, female owned booking agencies, and female owned management agencies. What are some of the most important lessons you have learned from your experience in music paths? There will always be people who don’t like you or your music. Persevere through the criticism and harsh critique. Diligently practice your craft. Be true to yourself. What is the impact of American Roots music on the socio-cultural implications? How do you want it to affect people? Without American Roots music, there would be no blues music. The blues has given birth to many different genres. It all comes from the same DNA, the same lineage. We are all the same, in that sense. Let’s take a trip with a time machine, so where and why would you really want to go for a whole day? I would love to time travel back to 1967 to the Monterey Pop Festival. I would love to seeJanis Joplin, Jimi Hendrix, and Otis Redding perform. I would also like to time travel back to 1965 Chicago, IL to hear Big Mama Thornton, John Lee Hooker, Willie Dixon, Buddy Guy, and Muddy Waters in one big jam session. I’d love to sit down at a big table with them, have a couple of drinks, and just listen to them talk. Interview by Michael Limnios [embedded content] Spread the love           1         1    
  • HD Radio Network
    Post Views: 9,921 Interview with Canadian prolific songwriter/guitarist Adam Karch: his music embodies the spirit of Americana, a hybrid acoustic blues that consists of precise fingerpicking. How has the Blues and Roots music influenced your views of the world and the journeys you’ve taken? The Blues and Roots music have kept me grounded and focused on the simple things in life like good music. It’s a sort of music that stays true to itself and as there is always new music coming out you can still sort of rely on what feeling good blues and Roots music gives you (for me I mean.) I wish I lived in the 40’s and 50’s where things were still a little more simpler and music was appreciated for its simplicity and message. I’ve been introduced too many people and experiences from playing music. It has set me free and gave me meaning to what it’s like to become 100% yourself which I’m still working on. How do you describe your sound, music philosophy and songbook? Where does your creative drive come from? The music is essentially guitar and vocals, a very intimate sound where the vocals blend like an extra guitar string. No effects just a rich plug and play kind of sound. As for songwriting, I’m the type who will think about a melody in my head for months and then finally everything will come out within an hour. I’m not the most prolific songwriter but when the idea comes it eventually transforms into a song which I can call my own. Another way I write song is by recovering popular songs and we visiting them with and putting my twist on them as if I wrote them they come completely my song essentially. What do you love most from a solo acoustic performance? What is the hardest part and what are the secrets of? I’m probably most comfortable performing solo because of the space and room I have to go anywhere I want.  I’ll challenge myself while I’m playing a song to go off and see where it can take me. I might have a mental plan of where I might go on the guitar but there is always tension when I play which helps keep the audience guessing to a point. The hardest thing might be talking between songs, I’m not a big storyteller and sometimes I just want to let the music speak for itself but it depends… some night I’m like a comedian and I have no idea how that happens, but it works Are there any memories from gigs, jams, open acts and studio sessions which you’d like to share with us? When I was 18, I was performing at the Tremblant Blues fest and I got the chance to play along with Coco Montoya for a few songs. We were both left-handed layers playing the same white Fender Strat. Every time I play the festival, I remember that gig and how lucky I was to be able to do that. As far as studio, I had a great experience recording this last record due to the fact that we took our time to record this record and sat back and re listened to songs, changed a few things, rerecorded certain songs until I felt it was the best I can do as an self-produced artist. What do you miss most nowadays from the music of the past? What are your hopes and fears for the future of? I miss all the greats that passed in recent to past years… I’ve learned a bunch from them though and I will always keep learning. I hope folk and blues music stays alive and for that matter makes a comeback. A lot of folks don’t know but all our music these days has some sort of root connection to old time music. If you could change one thing in the musical world and it would become a reality, what would that be? Well, I wouldn’t want to change anything on the exterior, I’d rather keep growing and change myself to become who I really am musically and that’s the fun in plating, learning and recording music. I wish blues and folk were as mainstream as pop these days just because I think it deserves that chance for the artists and the passion, they put into playing that type of music. What touched (emotionally) you from the railway adventures? What are the most important lessons of life you have learned? I’ve been a part of that program for a few years and what touches me is the stories you hear from passengers as you get to know them more and more after each song. Some sing along, some try to sing and other’s don’t care at all. It’s great to see who puts themselves out there when you present music to them especially in a live and intimate setting like on a train. What is the impact of Blues and Roots music on the socio-cultural implications? How do you want it to affect people? I want it to bring people together through music. Blues and Roots music has that effect on me but I’m not sure what effect it has on socio-culture…It’s a small niche this type of music and it’s a close-knit community through blues societies and other organizations. That’s one way of keeping people together and interested. Let’s take a trip with a time machine, so where and why would you really want to go for a whole day? I’d have to say Newport Folk festival 1963. I would have like to have seen Mississippi John Hurt’s performance. If you look at the video on YouTube, It’s like he’s playing in his living room but there are a sea of people at the show…The simplicity of people closing their eyes and taking it all in. Would have been a perfect folk picnic and I would have loved to have been a part of that. Imagine the stories you could have heard after that performance or after the whole festival for that matter.
  • HD Radio Network
    Tiger City Jukes was started in the big Norwegian blues boom in the mid-90s in the environment around the Oslo Blues Club. Singer and guitarist Knut Eide from Namsos met blues guitarist Harald Stokke in “Tiger City”, and after rehearsing for various bands ended up
  • HD Radio Network
    Post Views: 10,350 Interview with Canadian vocalist Sass Jordan: a pioneer of powerful, gritty female-fronted rock and blues performer released her album “Rebel Moon Blues”. How has the Blues and Rock Counterculture influenced your views of the world and the journeys you’ve taken? I would
  • HD Radio Network
    Post Views: 9,969 Interview with Canadian acoustic duo Rott’n Dan & Lightnin’ Willy: A music journey through the American south and the first half of the 20th Century, a time capsule in itself. How has Blues and Roots music influenced your views of the world
  • HD Radio Network
    Post Views: 9,012 On the weekend of February 14 and 15, 2020, Dag Bergesen hosted the sixth edition of The Little Blues Festival at Madam Felle in Bergen. Helga was a great success with sold out houses both evenings and audience records on the afternoon
  • HD Radio Network
    Post Views: 8,874 Rocker George Thorogood and his Destoyers are announced as one of the headliners for this year’s Notodden Festival. This will be his first visit to Norway after playing at the festival in 2015. Other new names on the poster are Gumbo, Grits

All images & transcripts are of Fair Use and copyright to their respected & collective owners.  Some images copyright AP, Clipart.com.